Tag Archives: pain clinics

More Than 20 Arrest Warrants Issued by Polk County Sheriff’s Office in Connection to Pill Mill Investigation

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The Polk County Sheriff’s Office issued 25 arrest warrants in connection to an ongoing pill mill investigation involving a medical clinic in Winter Haven, Florida. On September 19, 2012, the sheriff’s office announced that ten suspects in the case have been arrested, and 15 suspects with arrest warrants remain at large.

Click here to see the press release from the Polk County Sheriff’s Office.
Authorities Used the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program to find Suspects.

Last year the state launched the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, which requires doctors and pharmacists who dispense controlled substances to report the information to a statewide database.

According to the Polk County Sheriff’s Office, the database was used to round up those associated with the Winter Haven medical clinic.

In an article in the News Chief, deputies said 13 of the suspects were allegedly acting as “smurfs” (people hired by a drug ring to take fake prescriptions to be filled, then turning the pills over to the ring). Another 12 people were accused of “doctor shopping,” which is the practice of going to multiple doctors to get many prescriptions for narcotics.

To read the entire article from the News Chief, click here.

This case was investigated by the Polk County Sheriff’s Office, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLF), the Florida Department of Health (DOH) and the Attorney General’s (AG) Office.

“These people are giving the smurfs a bad name,” Papa Smurf stated. “We should be happy that law enforcement is doing a good job rounding up the read ‘bad guys,’”added Brainy Smurf.
Legal Tips for Physicians to Manage Pain Patients.

Doctors, pharmacists and all healthcare professionals who are involved in schemes relating to overprescribing or trafficking in narcotics may be targeted by many different agencies.

We have represented physicians who have been the subjects of Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations. The DEA will often use undercover agents and informants to pose as patients, wired for audio recording. The DEA will often work with local law enforcement authorities and the Department of Health (DOH).

Other investigations and arrests may be initiated by a statewide prosecutor’s office, which is under the Attorney General (AG). Still others have been initiated by the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU) where Medicaid funds are used.

Click here to see an article on our website with tips for to help manage pain patients.

Give us your thoughts on this story below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Health Care Providers in DOH Cases.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses, and other health care providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the DEA, Department of Health (DOH), and other law enforcement agencies.

If you are aware of an investigation of you or your practice, or if you have been contacted by the DEA or DOH, contact an experienced health law attorney immediately.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.
Sources:

Parody, Clifford. “25 Warrants Issued in Ongoing Pill Mill Case.” News Chief. (September 20, 2012). From: http://www.newschief.com/article/20120920/NEWS/209205012

Pavuk, Amy. “25 Arrest Warrants Issued in Pill-Mill Probe.” Orlando Sentinel. (September 19, 2012). From: http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2012-09-19/news/os-polk-pill-mill-arrests-20120919_1_pill-mill-probe-arrest-warrants-fraudulent-prescriptions

Eleazer, Carrie. “25 Arrest Warrants Issued in Connection to On-Going Pill Mill Investigation.” Polk County Sheriff’s Office. (September 19, 2012). From: http://www.polksheriff.org/NewsRoom/News%20Releases/Pages/09-19-2012.aspx
About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.
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Two Central Florida Physicians Connected to Statewide Pill-Mill Network

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

An Orlando and Jacksonville physician have been linked to a statewide pill-mill operation that brought in millions of dollars to pain clinic owners and doctors, according to the Orlando Sentinel. On June 27, 2012 seven doctors and seven pain clinic owners were arrested in the raid that was dubbed “Operation Pill Street Blues.” The two-year, multiagency investigation into the pill-mill operation spanned from Miami to Pensacola. The investigation included the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) and Florida law enforcement.

To view the DEA’s press release concerning the investigation, click here.

South Florida Firefighter Alleged Leader of Pill Mill.

Investigators named a 32-year-old Pompano Beach firefighter as the pill-mill’s ring leader. He allegedly used his image as a city firefighter and paramedic to develop a clean reputation with the local law enforcement.

He allegedly told his co-conspirators how to turn in other rogue doctors, pain clinics, and patients who abused drugs to authorities, so that their business would appear legitimate.

Millions of Oxycodone Pills were Prescribed in One Year.

Doctors recruited by the pill-mill network would allegedly write prescriptions to patients who did not have a medical need for the drugs or would prescribe excessive amounts of pills.

The seven doctors in the organization allegedly dispensed more than two million oxycodone tablets in one year. The Orlando and Jacksonville doctors allegedly prescribed more than 930,000 oxycodone pills between the two of them in a nine-month period.

Both Local Doctors Examined Undercover Detectives Posing as Patients During the Investigation.

Both doctors were visited by undercover detectives posing as patients. The Jacksonville doctor examined a detective who complained of minor back pain. She allegedly issued prescriptions for oxycodone and other drugs, even though the detective had no observable medical issues.

The affidavit details other undercover doctor visits, including those with the Orlando doctor at a pain management clinic in Fort Meyers. The initial exam between the doctor and the undercover detective allegedly lasted less than three minutes, before he gave the detective a prescription for oxycodone and other drugs.

Charges Vary from Racketeering to Manslaughter.

Those arrested for alleged involvement in the pill-mill scheme face charges ranging from racketeering, to trafficking of a controlled substance, to manslaughter.

On June 26, 2012, the day before authorities announced the charges, the Department of Health suspended the doctors’ licenses.

Pain management doctors click here to see if you’re in compliance with the recent changes to Florida’s pain management laws.

Patients with Severe Pain Speaking Out.

A former patient of a Vero Beach doctor arrested in the sting is one of hundreds who were prescribed strong narcotic pain medications at the alleged pill mills. Now she’s having a hard time finding the medications she needs to treat her conditions, including: a herniated disk, osteoarthritis and fibromyalgia. All of her conditions are listed in medical records and cause her severe pain. She is trying to find another doctor that is willing to prescribe her the medications she needs to function.

This situation is familiar to many patients in Florida with true medical need for prescription pain medications. These patients are finding it increasingly difficult to even locate a physician to treat them. Medical ethicists have commented on this problem, saying it is an issue that will become increasingly problematic for the foreseeable future.

To read more on operation “Pill Street Blue,” click here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with DEA Cases.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses, and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the DEA, Department of Health (DOH), and other law enforcement agencies.

If you are aware of an investigation of you or your practice, or if you have been contacted by the DEA or DOH, contact an experienced health law attorney immediately.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources Include:

Pavuk, Amy. “Authorities Link Orlando doctor, Daytona Clinic to Pill-Mill Network.” Orlando Sentinel. (July 14, 2012). From: http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2012-07-14/news/os-fernando-valle-pill-mill-network-20120714_1_pain-clinics-pill-mill-network-clinic-owners

Gordon, Lynn. “Former Patient of Vero Beach Doctor Arrested in Pill Mill Bust Talks.”WPEC-TV. (July 17, 2012). From: http://www.cbs12.com/news/top-stories/stories/vid_1092.shtml

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

Recent Pill Mill Bust in Florida Dubbed “Operation Pill Street Blues”

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A statewide pill mill bust that spanned several Florida cities was announced by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and Florida law enforcement on June 27, 2012. Seven doctors and seven pain clinic owners were arrested. The raid has been dubbed “Operation Pill Street Blues” by the DEA.

To view the DEA’s press release concerning the raid, click here.

Manslaughter and Trafficking Among Charges Against the Doctors and Pain Clinic Owners.

The doctors and pain clinic owners are facing a long list of charges. Some of the alleged offenses include: racketeering; conspiracy to commit racketeering; manslaughter; trafficking in a controlled substance; conspiracy to traffic in a controlled substance; delivery of a controlled substance; illegally prescribing a controlled substance by a practitioner; illegally prescribing a controlled substance (oxycodone hydrochloride) by a practitioner-trafficking amount; workers compensation fraud; and money laundering.

Investigation Unveiled Ring of Pill Mills Spanning Across Florida.

The arrests follow a two year investigation led by the DEA in conjunction with the Indian River County Sheriff’s Office, Vero Beach Police Department, and the Attorney General’s Office of Statewide Prosecution. The investigation began in Vero Beach in November 2010 after the DEA received complaints about a pain clinic that was allegedly writing a large amount of narcotics prescriptions.

During the investigation, DEA agents uncovered eight more pain clinics in Miami, Daytona Beach, Jacksonville, Sarasota, Gainesville and Pensacola that were allegedly involved in the same operation. DEA agents also learned that some of the pain clinics were allegedly owned by two active Pompano Beach firemen.

Pain Clinic Owners Allegedly Studied Other DEA Pill Mill Busts to Avoid Detection.

According to the DEA, the pain clinic owners allegedly researched public records relating to past DEA investigations such as Operation Pill Nation and Operation Oxy Alley. One of the pain clinic owners also allegedly educated others at the clinics on how to successfully report their competition to law enforcement.

Wire Intercepts, Informants, and Undercover Agents Used in Pain Clinic Investigations.

The investigation into the pain clinics involved the use of judicial wire intercepts, informants, and under cover visits to the pain clinics. Undercover agents allegedly visited each of the seven doctors charged. The agents were allegedly prescribed approximately 2,732 oxycodone tablets.

Law Enforcement Raids on Physicians, Pharmacists, Nurses and Other Health Providers Will Continue.

According to the DEA, Operation Pill Street Blues is an ongoing investigation. Additional arrests of co-conspirators, including other doctors and health providers, are forthcoming, according to the DEA. If you are a physician, pharmacist, nurse, or other health provider, ensure you are taking measures to protect yourself and your practice.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with DEA Cases.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the DEA, Department of Health (DOH), and other law enforcement agencies.

If you are aware of an investigation of you or your practice, or if you have been contacted by the DEA or DOH, contact an experienced health law attorney immediately.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources Include:

Ro, Mia. “Federal Investigation Takes Down New Breed of Pill Mills in Florida.” Drug Enforcement Administration. (June 27, 2012). Press Release. From: http://www.justice.gov/dea/pubs/states/newsrel/2012/mia062712.html

Roberts, John. “DEA, Florida Police Arrest 14 in Pill Mill Bust.” Fox News. (June 6, 2012). From http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/06/27/statewide-pill-mill-bust-involves-florida-municipal-workers/#ixzz1zBvQuGgC

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

Doctors and Nurse Practitioner Arrested in Prescription Drug Abuse Raid

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A crackdown on prescription drug abuse by New York law enforcement has resulted in the arrests of 98 people. Two doctors and a nurse practitioner were among those charged.

A series of raids were carried out by Brooklyn federal prosecutors, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), district attorney’s offices, and local law enforcement agencies. The raids began June 5, 2012 and resulted in the arrests.

To view the DEA’s press release concerning the raid, click here.

Both Doctors Accused of Overprescribing.

One of the doctors is accused of conspiring to distribute oxycodone to patients that were not legitimate. Allegedly, the doctor surrendered his DEA registration. This terminated his authority to prescribe controlled substances such as oxycodone. However, he allegedly attempted to use other health care practitioners to continue to prescribe drugs, which the government contends is illegal.

Another doctor involved in the crackdown is charged with illegal distribution of oxycodone. During the execution of a federal search warrant at his offices on March 1, 2012, the doctor voluntarily surrendered his DEA registration. However, he allegedly continued to issue prescriptions to those whom he knew were not legitimate patients.

We continually warn against “voluntarily relinquishing” DEA registrations or medical licenses with any investigation pending as this is treated the same as a revocation in most cases. For an article we have written on this, click here.

Florida Has Experienced Similar Prescription Drug Abuse Crackdowns.

Starting around two years ago, Florida health providers involved in narcotics precribing became routine targets for law enforcement. This was part of a concerted effort by state and federal officials to crackdown on “pill mill” operations. Regulations increased. Lawmakers enacted severe penalties for doctors and other health professionals accused of over-prescribing. Most physicians were banned from dispensing drugs in their offices. The governor created a Florida drug “strike force” with a mission to eliminate any pain clinics that were found to be breaking the law. The Florida Surgeon General and the Board of Medicine made announcements about the “crackdown” on “over-prescribing.”

Since the implementation of the new pain management and prescribing laws, the Florida strike force has made thousands of arrests and seized millions of pills of narcotics. This has resulted in serious concerns by those in the pain management profession.

Law Enforcement will Continue to Pursue Physicians, Pharmacists, Nurses and Other Health Providers.

The recent raid in New York and ongoing actions in Florida demonstrate that law enforcement will continue to pursue health professionals who prescribe large amounts of narcotics.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Overprescribing Charges and DEA Cases.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the DEA, Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources Include:

Allen, Jonathon. “Doctors Arrested in New York Prescription Drug Crackdown.” Reuters. (June 7, 2012). From http://in.reuters.com/article/2012/06/06/usa-crime-painkillers-idINL1E8H6E3J20120606

CBS News. “98 Arrested in NY Prescription Drug Sweep.” CBS News. (June 6, 2012). From http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-201_162-57448268/dozens-arrested-in-ny-prescription-drug-bust/

McKenzie-Mulvey, Erin. “U.S. Attorney Lynch, District Attorneys, DEA, Other Law Enforcement Announce Prescription Drug Initiative.” Drug Enforcement Administration. (June 7, 2012). Press Release. From: http://www.justice.gov/dea/pubs/states/newsrel/2012/nyc060712a.html

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

Florida Pain Clinics Can Expect More Bullying From Law Enforcement

Florida pain clinics really began to feel the impact of becoming law enforcement’s newest target about one year ago. This was based in part on televison “magazine” shows and investigative reporters’ shows and articles publicizing many abuses by patients who were “doctor shopping” and physicians who were allegedly “over-prescribing.”

More regulations were enacted, and lawmakers approved severe penalties for doctors accused of over-prescribing, including prison sentences. Most physicians were banned from dispensing drugs in their offices, and the governor created a Florida drug “strike team” whose mission was to eliminate any pain clinics that were found to be suspicious. The Florida Surgeon General and the Board of Medicine made announcements about the “crackdown” on “over-prescribing.”

According to the Orlando Sentinel, since the implementation of the new pain management and prescribing laws, the Florida strike force has made thousands of arrests and seized millions of pills in an effort to curb alleged over-prescribing and prescription drug abuse.

Now, after a year of strict regulations and punishments for Florida’s pain management physicians, pain clinics, pharmacists and pharmacies, the state is continuing to attack the pain management profession. While the planned measures aren’t as harsh as those that began a year ago, such as installing prescription drop boxes at police stations, they continue to place a stigma on the practice of pain management – a medical subspecialty with the purpose of alleviating the pain of suffering patients.

In addition, patients with true medical need for prescription pain medications are finding it increasingly difficult to even locate a physician to treat them, given the stigma and the possibility of arrest and prosecution. Medical ethicists have commented on this problem, an issue that will become increasingly problematic for the foreseeable future.

If you work in the pain management industry (physician, pharmacist, pain clinic, pharmacy, etc.) and feel that your medical license, pharmacy license, or business is at risk or is under investigation by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) or Florida Department of Health (DOH), please visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com for more information about this.

Orlando Health Attorney Featured in Latest Issue of Medical Economics

Orlando, Fla. – March 15, 2012 – George F. Indest III, President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, shares his knowledge of health law in the March 14 issue of Medical Economics. Mr. Indest was interviewed and quoted for an article concerning legal advice for primary care physicians who prescribe painkillers. In the article he provided information based on his experience in defending physicians charged with over-prescribing with the DEA and Florida DOH, Board of Medicine.

The article, “5 ways to avoid over-prescribing allegations,” includes tips written by Mr. Indest for physicians to follow if they practice pain management. The article can be read in its entirety here.

Mr. Indest is a well-known attorney specializing in the representation of health professionals and health care providers throughout Florida. His practice encompasses all aspects of health law, including pain management and pain medicine physician and clinic defense, defense of professional licensing cases, representation in investigations, defense in credentialing matters, Medicare and Medicaid audits, formation of corporations and limited liability companies (LLCs), Board of Medicine hearings, peer review actions, clinical privileges hearings, representation of medical students, and other matters of health care law and legal representation of health care professionals.

In 1999, Mr. Indest started The Health Law Firm, which has three Florida offices in Altamonte Springs, Orlando, and Pensacola. A former Navy JAG Corps attorney, he has practiced law for over 30 years.

For more information about The Health Law Firm visit http://www.thehealthlawfirm.com.

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About The Health Law Firm
The Health Law Firm was established in 1999, bringing together a team of experienced attorneys with decades of work in the legal and healthcare fields. With offices in Altamonte Springs, Orlando and Pensacola, Florida, the firm represents healthcare providers, including hospitals, nursing homes, physicians, dentists, mental health professionals and other licensed health professionals and entities. For more information about The Health Law Firm, visit http://www.thehealthlawfirm.com.

For additional information contact:
Kara Large
Office: (407) 331-6620, ext. 219
Cell: (407) 921-4322

The DEA Attacks Legitimate Pharmaceutical Distributors, Starting with CVS Pharmacy and Cardinal Health

Earlier in February 2012, the DEA accused both CVS Pharmacy, one of the nation’s largest drug store chains, and Cardinal Health, one of the nation’s largest legitimate distributors of pharmaceuticals, of endangering the public by selling excessive amounts of oxycodone to four Florida pharmacies. For Cardinal Health, the charges came in an immediate suspension order served Feb. 3, 2012, when the DEA suspended Cardinal’s license to distribute controlled substances from its Lakeland, Florida location, which serves four states, according to USA Today. Lakeland is located between Orlando and Tampa.

Cardinal immediately challenged the suspension in federal court denying the charges. The DEA’s suspension was temporarily lifted and a hearing was scheduled in the federal district court in Washington, D.C. In preparation for the hearing, the DEA and Cardinal filed hundreds of pages of documents that provide a look into how prescription painkillers have infiltrated the black market. We are attempting to obtain copies of some of these so that we can share them with other interested attorneys and individuals.

As reported in various media sources, the investigation into Cardinal’s operation began after a Cardinal investigator became aware of a rumor that a local pharmacy was selling oxycodone by the pill for cash. This Florida pharmacy was reported to be one of Cardinal’s biggest customers.

Over the next two years, Cardinal employees allegedly visited the same pharmacy at least four more times. Each time, they noted the following suspicious signs: Customers paid cash, oxycodone was the top seller, and young people came into the pharmacy in groups to have their prescriptions filled. The pharmacy allegedly dispensed 462,776 oxycodone pills over a two month period — which is what the DEA states is approximately seven times what the average pharmacy dispenses in a year. Additionally the pharmacy allegedly asked Cardinal for more. Cardinal filled the order for more oxycodone but terminated the pharmacy as a customer.

By the time Cardinal cut the pharmacy off in October 2011, police had arrested at least three doctors who were associated with or had their patients’ prescriptions filled at the pharmacy.  Law enforcement officials charged them with trafficking in oxycodone, racketeering and over-prescribing narcotics.

Then, in early February 2012, the DEA reportedly suspended the DEA registrations (sometimes called “DEA numbers” or “DEA licenses”) of four of Cardinal’s largest Florida customers. These suspensions demonstrate the DEA’s strategy to combat the country’s prescription drug abuse problem at the highest levels, regardless of the size or reputation of the company. After years of attacking doctors who dispense drugs from pain clinics, DEA agents are now targeting the legitimate pharmaceutical distributers — the top of the legitimate drug supply chain.

The number of overdose deaths involving prescription pain medications allegedly now exceeds deaths from heroin and cocaine combined, which motivates state and federal agents to be more aggressive in fighting against misuse of drugs.

Under the federal Controlled Substances Act, the DEA regulates every link in the supply chain for controlled substances such as oxycodone and hydrocodone, including manufacturers, distributors, doctors and pharmacies. According to the DEA, approximately 1.4 million entities have DEA registrations to handle controlled pharmaceuticals. The law requires pharmaceutical distributors, like Cardinal Health, to have systems to detect suspicious orders, which must then be reported to the DEA.  Additionally, federal regulations require that any thefts, losses or shortages of controlled medications be reported to the DEA.

In court documents filed in response to Cardinal’s challenge, the DEA said Cardinal ignored “red flags” raised to detect suspicious orders. However, Cardinal argues that volume alone is not enough to determine whether a pharmacy is diverting the drugs, because it does not account for a pharmacy’s location, the age and health of the population, and the proximity to hospitals, nursing homes and cancer centers.

The DEA routinely cites the volumes of drugs a pharmacy fills or the numbers of tablets of a certain type of medication for which a doctor writes prescriptions.  This is also a factor the DEA uses in cases we have seen where it seeks to suspend or revoke the DEA registrations of physicians and pharmacies in administrative cases.  However, some judges have expressed a reluctance to admit such “bean counting” or naked numbers as being irrelevant, when not supported by testimony or evidence placing the numbers into context with other factors, such as the physician’s practice, patient mix, standards of treatment, severity of illness, etc.

In the federal court case now pending, Cardinal has stated in papers filed that it has a “robust” detection system and has cut off more than 330 pharmacies, including 140 pharmacies located in Florida, over the past four years that it decided posed an unreasonable risk of diversion.

In a news article posted late on February 29, 2012, the Associated Press advised that federal Judge Reggie Walton had ruled against Cardinal Health earlier in the day.  Apparently Cardinal Health had originally obtained a “stay” (sometimes referred to as a “temporary restraining order” or “temporary injunction”) against the DEA’s suspension order.  However, after a hearing held on February 29 in which Cardinal Health sought an injunction against the DEA’s enforcement of its suspension, Judge Walton announced a decision form the bench.  He reportedly refused to grant Cardinal Health an injunction against the DEA, apparently agreeing with the DEA’s position.

This battle between Cardinal Health and the DEA is an important one as it demonstrates the DEA continued efforts to attempt to exert more control over pain clinics, pain management physicians, pharmacists, pharmacies, and now, pharmaceutical distributors. If you believe that the DEA is investigating you, your facility, your company or if you want to learn more about the legal implications of pain management, visit our website to learn more.

Sources for this article included; the Orlando Sentinel, Boston Globe, Associated Press, USA Today and Florida Today.