Tag Archives: nurse practitioner

The Ins and Outs of Florida’s 2015 Legislative Session for Health Care Providers

10 Indest-2008-7George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in the Legal Specialty of Health Law

Committees are busy in Tallahassee as the 2015 Legislative Session is set to begin on March 3, 2015. For Florida physicians and other health care providers, now is the time to review the legislative bills that could affect you and your practice. There are many bills pending that could impact the future of medical practice and health care delivery in Florida.

On the table are some recognizable bills from last year, as well as a few new ones. To stay up to date on the 2015 Legislative Session as it relates to health care, check this blog regularly.

Bills Up for Consideration.

The two most profiled issues from the 2014 Legislative Session are back.

– House Bill (HB) 547 and the companion Senate bill (SB) 614 would give nurse practitioners the ability to prescribe controlled substances. It would also expand their scope of practice, which would exempt them from the requirement that certain medical acts be performed or supervised by a physician. To learn more on this bill, click here for our previous blog.

– HB 545 and the companion Senate bill SB 478 defines what is determined to be telemedicine or telehealth. These bills call for coverage in Medicaid programs. Lawmakers state an agreement has been made to require health care providers to be licensed in Florida to provide telemedicine in the state. House and Senate leaders have expressed confidence they will reach an agreement this year on telemedicine. Click here to learn more on telemedicine in Florida.

Each bill could dramatically change the landscape of the practice of Florida medicine.

Keep an Eye on These Additional Bills.

Other pending bills that could impact the delivery of health care in Florida, include:

– SB 516 addresses insurance coverage and reimbursement issues for emergency services;

– HB 279 would allow pharmacy interns to administer vaccinations to adults;

– HB 281 and SB 532 would allow licensed physician assistants under physician supervision to order controlled substances in the hospital setting; and

– HB 515 and SB 710 revise the scope of physical therapists and prohibit individuals with doctorates in physical therapy to present themselves as a doctor without informing the public of his or her actual profession as a physical therapist.

In Conclusion.

The 2015 Legislative Session is packed with bills that, if approved, will affect physicians, physician assistants, nurses, and other health care providers. As a health care provider, knowing the ins and outs of these bills can save you from the headache and possible fines that could come from non-compliance. We urge you to become involved with these issues. If you would like to know more, you can contact your local medical society. Again, we will stay on top of the progress of these bills, so check this blog regularly.

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents physicians, pharmacists, pharmacies, optometrists, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, HIPAA complaints and violations, NPDB actions, inspections and audits involving the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Stone, Rick. “PAs, Nurse Practitioners Could Get Prescribing Authority.” Health News Florida. (February 11, 2015). From: http://health.wusf.usf.edu/post/pas-nurse-practitioners-could-get-prescribing-authority?utm_source=Health+News+Florida+eAlert+subscriber+list&utm_campaign=e231ee3f8a-Friday_February_13_20152_13_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_8d22eaa6f6-e231ee3f8a-249582973

Saunders, Jim. “Telemedicine Deal Likely in 2015, Legislators Say.” Orlando Sentinel. (February 3, 2014). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/politics/os-florida-telemedicine-deal-20150203-story.html

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1999-2015 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

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Hydrocodone Combination Drugs Could Be Reclassified to Schedule II Category of Controlled Substances

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm, and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee voted 19 to 10 in favor of moving hydrocodone combination drugs from schedule III into the more restrictive schedule II category of controlled substances. According to a number of different sources, on January 25, 2013, the committee presented this recommendation to the FDA. If approved, hydrocodone combination drugs, such as Vicodin, will be harder for physicians to prescribe.

The advisory committee met because the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is requesting the FDA to approve the reclassification of hydrocodone combination products. The DEA wants to help curb the growing number of people across the country addicted to painkillers.

Click here to read an FDA briefing document given to the advisory committee.

It is now up to the FDA to decide whether or not to implement the advisory committee’s decision as to whether hydrocodone combination drugs will stay labeled as schedule III controlled substances or move to schedule II controlled substances. If medications containing hydrocodone are moved to schedule II, they will be in the same category as the widely abused oxycodone.

Hydrocodone Abuse is Serious.

Currently, hydrocodone products are the most widely prescribed drugs in the U.S., according to an article on MedPage Today. Records show that painkiller abuse kills more people in America than heroin and cocaine combined. The DEA argues that since these drugs are so frequently abused, they should be more tightly controlled.

To read the MedPage Today article, click here.

What You Need to Know as a Health Care Provider.

This change would have wide-spread consequences for health care professionals, especially doctors and pharmacists. Under the schedule II category of controlled substances, physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners would no longer be legally allowed to prescribe hydrocodone combination drugs.

If the recommendation is accepted, it would be more difficult for patients to obtain refills on hydrocodone combination drugs. Refills without a new prescription, faxed prescriptions and prescriptions called in by telephone would all be banned. Only written prescriptions from a doctor would be allowed.

If the recommendation is adopted, much stricter scrutiny on the purchasing, prescribing, retailing and use of these medications can also be expected. Prosecutions and administrative actions can also be expected to follow.

The FDA is also debating the DEA’s request to limit prescriptions of hydrocodone combination pills to a 90-day supply instead of the current regulations which permit five refills within six months.

Arguments Heard Against the Reclassification.

According to an article in The New York Times, many opponents spoke against the recommendation. Advocates for nursing home patients argued that weak and elderly residents with chronic pain would have to make a difficult trip to see a doctor just to get a prescription refilled. Click here to read The New York Times article.

Some committee members questioned if there was another option to consider versus changing the scheduling. They questioned whether greater use of e-prescribing and Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, as well as better education efforts for clinicians and patients would be better solutions for the drug abuse epidemic.

Now it remains to be seen how the FDA will interpret the advisory committee’s recommendation.

Florida’s Prescription Drug Abuse Epidemic.

Florida law enforcement including the DEA, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and Department of Health (DOH) all seem to be having a hard time keeping up with prescription drug abuse in Florida.

We have written a number of blogs on the abuse of narcotics in Florida. See our blog on a fake prescription ring busted in Osceola County, and a Central Florida nurse accused of illegally obtaining prescriptions for painkillers, for example. Check our website for similar blogs.

Pharmacists, pharmacies, legal distributors and physicians are often too caught up in the frenzy to stem prescription drug abuse and to eliminate “pill mills.”

Call Experienced Health Law Attorneys for Your Legal Needs.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.
Sound Off.

As a health care professional, do you think hydrocodone products should be labeled as a schedule II controlled substance? What are the positive and negative effects of this decision? Please leave any thoughtful comment below.
Sources:

Fiore, Kristina. “FDA Panel Votes for Tighter Controls on Vicodin.” MedPage Today. (January 25, 2013). From: http://bit.ly/X8qlsu

Tavernise, Sabrina. “F.D.A. Likely to Add Limits on Painkillers.” The New York Times. (January 25, 2013). From: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/26/health/fda-vote-on-restricting-hydrocodone-products-vicodin.html?_r=0
About the Authors: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.
“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Nurses: Advanced Practice May Mean Advanced Legal Issues

From George Indest’s Nursing Law Manual

The advanced nurse is a registered nurse (RN) who has completed some form of advanced nursing education and training.  Two types of advanced nurses are the advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP) and the certified nurse specialist.  In Florida, there are three types of certified nurse specialists: certified registered nurse anesthetists, certified nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners.  The potential risk of liability for an advanced nurse is as real as the risks for any other nurse.  In addition to all of the legal issues that a registered nurse is faced with, the advanced nurse is susceptible to even more legal issues.

Advanced nurses are held to higher standards of care than RNs or licensed practical nurses (LPNs) because of the higher degree of education and training that an advanced nurse is required undergo.  Advanced nurses are required to meet further certification requirements in order to become licensed.  The additional certification requirements were established because advanced nurses have a much broader scope of practice than RNs or LPNs.

An advanced nurse is held to all of the same duties and standards as a RN, as well as additional duties that are placed on the advanced nurse because of advanced training.  A failure to uphold the duties of a nurse can lead to the same consequences that a registered nurse could face, including action being taken by the Board of Nursing against the nurses license.

Advanced Registered Nurse Practioner (ARNP)

In Florida, an advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP) can only perform medical acts of diagnosis, treatment and operation under the supervision of a Florida-licensed medical doctor, osteopathic physician, or dentist.

The Board of Nursing, has established rules, pursuant to Florida Statutes, which regulate the requirements for a protocol between a physician or a dentist and an ARNP.  The protocol must be in writing and signed by both the ARNP and the physician or dentist, showing a mutual agreement between the parties.  The protocol must also include a description of the duties of the ARNP;  a description of the duties of the physician or dentist;  the management areas for which the ARNP is responsible, including the conditions for which therapies may be initiated and the treatments that may be initiated by the ARNP, depending on patient condition and judgment of the ARNP;  and the drug therapies that the ARNP may prescribe, initiate, monitor, alter, or order.  The protocol must include a provision for annual review by the parties which are privy to the protocol

In addition, the original protocol must be submitted to the Board within thirty days of the renewal of the ARNP’s license.  A copy of the protocol and a copy of the notice required by Section 458.348(1), Florida Statutes, shall be kept at the site of practice of each party to the protocol.  Any alterations to the protocol or amendments should be signed by the ARNP and the physician, or dentists and filed with the Board within 30 days of the alteration to be kept in the Department of Health for filing purposes only.  Specific conditions and a procedure for identifying those conditions that require direct evaluation or specific consultation by the physician or dentist must be contained within the protocol.

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA)

Administration of anesthesia by a certified registered nurse anesthetists requires special training and certification.  Oversight and availability of an anesthesiologist is required by most organizations.  The major risks for registered nurse anesthetists include the improper placement of an airway, failure to recognize significant changes in a patient’s condition and the improper use of anesthetics.

Nurse Practitioner (NP)

A nurse practitioner, NP, is a registered nurse who has completed the necessary education to engage in primary health care decision making.  A physician may not delegate a task to a NP when regulations specify that the physician must perform it personally or when the delegation is prohibited by state law or by an organizations own policies.  A NP who practices outside of her scope of practice can be sanctioned by the Department of Health and if an injury occurs to a patient that NP can be civilly liable to the patient.

Certified Nurse Midwives (CNM)

Nurse midwives provide comprehensive prenatal care including delivery for patients who are at low risk for complications.  Nurse midwives manage normal prenatal, intrapartum and postnatal care.  In addition, nurse midwives will care for newborns as long as there are no complications.  Nurse midwives also provide primary care for women’s issues from puberty to post menopause.  The standard of care for a certified nurse midwife is that of a reasonably prudent certified nurse midwife engaged in the practice obstetrics and gynecology.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) INVESTIGATION

One of the biggest mistakes an advanced nurse makes when being investigated by the Department of Health, DOH, is failing to forward a complete copy of the patient medical record when subpoenaed by the DOH investigator as part of the investigation process.  If the advanced nurse does not make an objection to the DOH investigators request for a copy of a patient’s medical record, he or she is required to forward the medical record to the investigator.  A failure to comply with this can lead to further disciplinary action against a nurse’s license.
For more information about nursing law, or to read more from the Nursing Law Manual, visit www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.