Tag Archives: Medicare investigation

South Florida Pharmacy Owner Pleads Guilty to $23 Million Health Care Fraud Scheme

00011_RT8By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A co-owner and operator of three Miami-area pharmacies pleaded guilty on December 6, 2012, for his part in a $23 million health care fraud scheme. The pharmacy owner allegedly admitted in the Florida Southern Federal District Court to one count of conspiracy to commit health care fraud and one count of conspiracy to pay illegal health care kickbacks, according to a Department of Justice (DOJ) press release.

Click here to read the entire press release from the DOJ.

Pharmacy Owner Used Kickbacks and Referrals to Allegedly Scam Medicare and Medicaid.

According to court documents, the pharmacy owner allegedly admitted to paying illegal kickbacks to an unnamed number of co-conspirators in return for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiary information. That information was then used to submit fraudulent claims. A majority of the beneficiaries referred to the owner’s pharmacies reportedly resided at assisted living facilities (ALFs) in Miami.

The court documents state that the pharmacy owner also allegedly paid kickbacks to physicians in exchange for prescription referrals which were also billed to Medicare.

Unused and Partially Used Medicine Part of Scheme.

As part of the scheme, the pharmacy owner allegedly instructed drivers working for his pharmacies to pick up unused medications from ALFs around Miami. The medications were then allegedly placed back into pill bottles. Unused and partially used medications were billed back to Medicare and Medicaid, according to court documents.

Click here to read the court documents on this case.

The pharmacy owner and his co-conspirators allegedly submitted more than $23 million in false and fraudulent claims to Medicare and Florida Medicaid programs.

Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late; Consult with a Health Law Attorney Experienced in Medicare and Medicaid Issues Now.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm represent healthcare providers in Medicare audits, ZPIC audits and RAC audits throughout Florida and across the U.S. They also represent physicians, medical groups, nursing homes, home health agencies, pharmacies, hospitals and other healthcare providers and institutions in Medicare and Medicaid investigations, audits, recovery actions and termination from the Medicare or Medicaid Program.

For more information please visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com or call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001.

Comments?

What do you think of this case? Is the Miami area just a hotbed for Medicare and Medicaid schemes? Please leave any thoughtful comment below.

Sources:

United States of America v. Jose Carlos Morales. Case Number 12-23374, Preliminary Injunction and Supporting Memorandum of Law. (September 14, 2012). From: http://www.thehealthlawfirm.com/uploads/USA%20v%20Morales.pdf

Department of Justice. “Pharmacy Owner Pleads Guilty in Miami for Role in $23 Million Health Care Fraud Scheme.” Department of Justice . (December 6, 2012). From: http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2012/December/12-crm-1461.html

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

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CVS Possibly Under Investigation for Medicare Fraud

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has reportedly launched an investigation into CVS’ practice for refilling prescriptions. According to an article in the Los Angeles Times, authorities are looking into reports that CVS has been refilling prescriptions and submitting insurance claims without patients’ permission. The Los Angeles Times article, released October 12, 2012, names an official with knowledge of this matter as the source.

We want to emphasize that this is from an unconfirmed news story. The government rarely announces investigations of specific subjects ahead of time.

Click here to read the entire article from the Los Angeles Times.

CVS Has Not Been Contacted By the Government About an Investigation.

A related article in Reuters states that CVS said it has not been contacted by the government about the investigation. The pharmacy also said, as a policy, the company does not condone unauthorized refills. Officials said to allow unauthorized prescription refills could be considered insurance fraud, especially if insurers were not refunded for any drugs rejected by patients.

The probe might be, in part, related to the programs offered by many drugstores that allows a pharmacy to refill prescriptions even before a refill request has been made by the patient.

Click here to read the entire article from Reuters.

So far there is no news from the OIG for the HHS officially confirming this investigation.

Cause for Investigation?

It is unclear to me why there would be any cause to investigate CVS, if Medicare was not being billed until the customer actually picked up the prescription. If the customer fails to pickup the prescription, every drug store I know of restocks the medication after a short period and no one is ever billed for it. It seems that it would be a quick and simple matter for the OIG to check this.

Furthermore, it could also be argued that CVS  is actually promoting good health by this practice. Patients may forget to renew or refill their prescriptions or may fail to notice they are running low.

Two Sanford, Fla., CVS Stores Make Headlines.

On September 12, 2012, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) revoked the registrations (controlled substance licenses) from two CVS pharmacies in Sanford, Florida. The two pharmacies are no longer able to fill prescriptions for drugs such as oxycodone, Dilaudid, Vicodin, Ritalin and Xanax. This decision was in response to a government crackdown on the distribution of painkillers. Click here to read a blog on this story.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think of this story? Do you think CVS is doing anything wrong? How is this any different from the practice of many managed care plans mailing out 90 days of medications to its patients at a time? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Lazarus, David. “CVS Caremark Prescription Refills Under Scrutiny, Source Says.” Los Angeles Times. (October 12, 2012). From: http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-lazarus-20121012,0,1032269.column

Alawadhi, Neha, Wohl, Jessica, and Morgan, David. “CVS Unaware of Any Government Prescription Refill Probe.” Reuters. (October 12, 2012). From: http://www.reuters.com/assets/print?aid=USBRE89B19520121012

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 
“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Revised Readmission Penalties are Coming Due to Calculation Errors

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Back in August of 2012, I wrote that lower Medicare reimbursement rates were coming to more than 2,000 hospitals around the country due to excessive readmission rates. To see that blog, click here.

In October of 2012, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced it has discovered errors in its initial calculations. This means, 1,422 hospitals with high readmission rates will lose slightly more money than first expected, according to Kaiser Health News.

Click here to read the entire article from Kaiser Health News.

Hiccup  in Medicare’s Hospital Readmission Reduction Program.

According to Kaiser Health News, the revisions were relatively small, averaging two-hundredths of a percent of a hospital’s regular Medicare reimbursements. Florala Memorial Hospital in Alabama will see the largest increase in its reimbursements, from 0.62 to 0.73 percent.

Originally, Medicare said it would base the penalties on the readmission rates for patients who were discharged from July 2008 through June 2011. According to a notice the CMS published, the mistake happened because the agency accidentally included claims before July 1, 2008, in its evaluations. Click here to see the notice from the CMS.

Program Initiated to Lower Hospitals’ Readmission Rates.

According to CMS, nearly one out of five Medicare patients will return to the hospital within a month of being discharged, these readmissions cost the government $17.5 billion in 2010. Medicare has estimated, with this program, it will recoup about $280 million from hospitals where too many patients return.

To see an updated list of hospital penalties, click here.

Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late; Consult with a Health Law Attorney Experienced in Medicare and Medicaid Issues Now.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm represent healthcare providers in Medicare audits, ZPIC audits and RAC audits throughout Florida and across the U.S. They also represent physicians, medical groups, nursing homes, home health agencies, pharmacies, hospitals and other healthcare providers and institutions in Medicare and Medicaid investigations, audits, recovery actions and termination from the Medicare or Medicaid Program.

For more information please visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com or call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001.

Comments?

What do you think about this story? Does this error by the CMS leave you jaded about the program? Leave any thoughtful comments below.


Sources:

Rau, Jordan. “Medicare Revises Hospitals’ Readmissions Penalties.” Kaiser Health News. (October 2, 2012). From: http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Stories/2012/October/03/medicare-revises-hospitals-readmissions-penalties.aspx

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

How to Speed Up the Medicare Prepayment Review Process

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

For Medicare providers, being notified of an impending audit is not welcome news. Being notified of a prepayment review is even worse. In a prepayment review, the health care provider must submit documentation to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) contractor before ever receiving payment. The health care provider will only receive payment (typically months later) if the contractor is satisfied with the provider’s documentation. This can be financially disastrous for the health care provider, who still must pay day-to-day expenses while waiting for a decision.

CMS Contractors.

If you have received notice of prepayment review, you first need to determine the contractor that has initiated the review. CMS contracts with four types of contractors:

– Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs);

– Comprehensive Error Rate Testing (CERT) contractors; 

– Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs); and

– Zone Program Integrity Contractors (ZPICs).

Both the Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs) and Zone Program Integrity Contractors (ZPICs) can initiate prepayment reviews.

MAC Prepayment Reviews.

MACs will initiate prepayment reviews of health care providers suspected of improper billing for services. If the MAC detects anything resembling fraud during the process, the prepayment review can extend for up to a year or more. However, MACs will generally terminate the prepayment review when the health care provider demonstrates a pattern of correct billing. Health care providers who are notified of a MAC prepayment review should consult with an experienced health care attorney from the beginning of the process. An experienced health attorney will be able to assist the health care provider to ensure everything is in place for a speedy prepayment review.

ZPIC Prepayment Reviews.

A MAC may refer a health care provider to a ZPIC for a benefit integrity prepayment review if they suspect fraud. A ZPIC can also initiate a benefit integrity prepayment review based on data analysis.  Unlike MACs, ZPICs generally are less willing to communicate with health care providers about the prepayment review.

Additionally, there are different time limitations for a benefit integrity prepayment review. The MAC prepayment review is governed by Medicare Manual provisions that stipulate a maximum length of time on a prepayment review. However, a benefit integrity prepayment review can last indefinitely, if the basis for the review is not timely and properly addressed by the health care provider.

Further, ZPICs make fraud referrals to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Inspector General (OIG). Thus, health care providers should view ZPIC correspondence as the start of a potentially larger investigation. An experienced health care attorney should be contacted immediately after a health care provider receives any contact from ZPIC.

How to Accomplish a Quick Review.

In many cases, the health care provider will be on Medicare prepayment review until its billing accuracy reaches a certain percentage. However there are other steps to help speed up the Medicare prepayment audit process.

1.  Read everything from the Contractor Carefully.

Pay close attention to all correspondence sent by the contractor. Make a note of the due date given and make sure your response is sent well within the time limits. Denials will usually occur if a response is not received by the given deadline. Also be sure that you send your response to the correct office.

2.  Read and Be Familiar with all Local Coverage Determinations (LCDs).

You should read and be familiar with any and all applicable local coverage determinations (LCDs) and national coverage determinations (NCDs) for any codes, services, supplies or equipment you are billing.

3.  Contact an Experienced Health Care Attorney Immediately.

A health care attorney who is experienced in prepayment reviews will be able to help you file a proper response in a timely fashion. An attorney will also be able to help find out additional information on why you have been placed on prepayment review and exactly what documentation the auditor is looking for. Alternatively, a health care consultant who has actual experience in working on Medicare cases and who has been an expert witness in Medicare hearings may be able to assist, as well.

4.  Contact the Contractor Responsible for the Review.

After you have consulted with an attorney, schedule a call with the contractor responsible for your prepayment review. During the call learn as many details about the audit as you can and find out what the reviewer wants in the documentation.

However, DO NOT:

  a. Argue with the auditor.

  b. Berate or demean the auditor.

  c. Challenge the auditor’s knowledge, competence or credentials.

  d. Ask the auditor to prove anything to you.

  e. Demand to speak to the auditor’s supervisor.

5.  Do Not File Duplicate Claims.

Keep track of all requests for additional documentation and when they were received. Do not think that you need to file another claim for the same items just because you have not received a response as quickly as other claims where additional documentation was not requested. If you provide duplicate claims, the contractor’s decision can be delayed.

6.  Keep all Submissions and Results Organized.

You must keep track of the date you receive the document request for a claim, the date you submitted the documentation for review, the result of the audit and the date the result was received. This will help you realize how quickly claims are reviewed. If a one claim’s review has taken longer than the others you’ve submitted, you can contact the reviewer to make sure they have received the claim and everything is in order.

7.  Follow-up with the Contractor for Feedback.

Keep in contact with the contractor throughout the review. This will help to maintain the relationship you initiated after first receiving notice of the prepayment review. This will also help you keep track of any issues and resolve them. Be sure to discuss how you can improve your claim submissions to meet the standards of your particular reviewer.

Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late; Consult with a Health Law Attorney Experienced in Medicare and Medicaid Issues Now.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm represent health care providers in prepayment reviews. They also represent physicians, medical groups, nursing homes, home health agencies, pharmacies, hospitals and other healthcare providers and institutions in Medicare and Medicaid investigations, audits, recovery actions and termination from the Medicare or Medicaid Program.

For more information please visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com or call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001.

Sources:

Baird, Jeff. “Q&A with Jeff Baird: How to Prepare for and Survive Prepayment Reviews.” Home Care. (Sept. 13, 2010). From http://homecaremag.com/news/prepayment-review-faq-20100913/

Greene, Stephanie Morgan. “5 Steps to Get Off Pre-Payment Audit – Quickly!” Harrington Managment Group. (Mar. 18, 2011). From http://homecaremag.com/news/prepayment-review-faq-20100913/

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Excess Readmissions Mean Lower Medicare Reimbursement Rates for More than 2,000 Hospitals, Including 131 in Florida

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Lower Medicare reimbursement rates are coming in October of 2012, to 2,211 hospitals around the country, including 131 in Florida. This is allegedly due to excessive readmission rates in these hospitals between July 2008 and June 2011, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). This story was originally reported by Kaiser Health News on August 13, 2012, and by other sources.

To read more on the readmissions reduction program, click here.


Starting in October 2012, Millions of Dollars in Penalties will be Deducted from Medicare Reimbursements.

Starting October 1, 2012, penalties will be deducted from Medicare reimbursements each time a hospital submits a claim.

All together these hospitals will give up about $280 million in Medicare funds over the next year as the government begins a push to start paying health care providers based on the quality provided, according to the Kaiser Health News article. The government apparently considers readmissions a prime symptom of an overly expensive and uncoordinated health system.

The CMS records show nine hospitals in Florida, including Florida Hospital in Orlando, will deal with a one percent (1%) decrease caused by the penalties.

To see the 2013 Medicare readmissions penalties in Florida, click here.

Medicare Attempting to Lower Readmission Rates.

According to the CMS nearly two million Medicare beneficiaries return to the hospital within a month of being discharged, costing Medicare $17.5 billion in additional hospital bills. CMS states the national average readmission rate is slightly above nineteen percent (19%).

Who Will Lose the Most Medicare Funds?

The penalties will fall heaviest on hospitals in New Jersey, New York, the District of Columbia, Arkansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Illinois, and Massachusetts. Hospitals that treat mostly low-income patients will be hit particularly hard as well. This is all according to the report by Kaiser Heath News.

The analysis of the penalties shows seventy-six percent (76%) of the hospitals that have a majority of low-income patients will lose Medicare funds.

More Than 1,100 Hospitals Will Not Be Penalized.

The CMS report found 1,156 hospitals with acceptable readmission rates. Those hospitals will not lose any money. The analysis showed, on average, the readmission penalties were lightest on hospitals in Utah, South Dakota, Vermont, Wyoming and New Mexico. Idaho was the only state where no hospital was penalized by Medicare.

The Maximum Penalty to Increase Next Year.

The CMS notes the maximum penalty will increase to two percent (2%) starting in October 2013, and then to three percent (3%) the following year.

These penalties are part of an effort by Medicare to use its financial backbone to force improvements in hospital quality.

On top of the readmission reduction program, on August 27, 2012, the CMS will begin the Recovery Audit Prepayment Review (RAPR), in which Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) will review a number of hospitals’ Medicare claims.
I previous wrote about the RAPR, click here to read that post.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Handling Medicare Audits.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent physicians, medical groups, clinics, pharmacies, durable medical equipment (DME) suppliers, home health agencies, nursing homes and other healthcare providers in Medicare investigations, audits and recovery actions.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Rua, Jordan. “Medicare To Penalize 2,211 Hospitals For Excess Readmissions.” Kaiser Health News. (August 13, 2012). From: http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/stories/2012/august/13/medicare-hospitals-readmissions-penalties.aspx?referrer=search

Kaiser Health News. “First Hospital Penalties for High Readmissions Detailed.” Kaiser Health News. (August 13, 2012). From: http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/daily-reports/2012/august/13/quality-issues.aspx?referrer=search

Health News Florida. “Readmit Rates Cost FL Hospitals.” Health News Florida. (August 13, 2012). From: http://www.healthnewsflorida.org/hnf_stories/read/readmit_rates_cost_fl_hospitals

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

U.S Department of Justice (DOJ) Investigating the Cardiology Services at Florida Hospitals

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law
On Monday, August 6, 2012, a New York Times article revealed that cardiology services at some Florida HCA hospitals are under investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) for allegedly performing unnecessary procedures to increase profits.

Click here to see the entire New York Times article posted August 6, 2012.

I previously blogged about and published an article on how a number of medical specialty societies have released lists of unnecessary or ineffective procedures.

To read that article, originally published in Medical Economics, click here.

The DOJ investigating Hospital Chain.

The report cites evidence that some HCA hospitals were performing unnecessary heart procedures for the sole purpose of driving up profits. According to the internal reports, some doctors allegedly made misleading statements in medical records to make it appear to subsequent reviewers that the procedures were necessary.

HCA said the Civil Division of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Miami has asked for information about reviews that assess the medical necessity of some interventional cardiology services. The company also said the Civil Division of the DOJ has contacted HCA as part of a national review of whether charges to the federal government for implantable cardiac defibrillators met government criteria.

The DOJ indicated it will review billing and medical records at 95 HCA hospitals.

Details About the Procedures and the Company’s Knowledge of Them Were Found by the New York Times.

Details about the procedures and the company’s knowledge of them were found in thousands of pages of confidential company memos, e-mail correspondence among executives, transcripts from hearings and reports from outside consultants examined by The New York Times, as well as interviews with doctors and others. A review of the documents revealed that instead of questioning whether patients had been harmed or whether regulators needed to be contacted, hospital officials asked for information on how the physicians’ activities affected the hospitals’ bottom line profits.

HCA Posts Four-Page Response Letter on Its Website.

Prior to The New York Times story breaking, HCA posted a four-page letter on its website, explaining that The New York Times “appears to be making broad points concerning patient care provided at our company’s affiliated hospitals.”

The letter is complete with two pages of charts detailing totals for certain procedures performed at HCA locations.

According to the HCA letter, the decision on the necessity of some heart procedures is “the subject of much debate in the cardiology community.” It also states that based on Medicare inpatient data, trends concerning the number of cardiac catheterizations and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) performed at HCA-affiliated hospitals compare closely to the rest of the nation.

To see the full letter from HCA, click here.

Cardiology Procedures Played a Large Role in HCA’s Profits.

Cardiology is apparently a booming business for HCA, and the profits from testing and performing heart surgeries played a critical role in the company’s bottom line in recent years.

Some of HCA’s busiest Florida hospitals performed thousands of stent procedures each year. Medicare reimburses hospitals about $10,000 for a cardiac stent and about $3,000 for a diagnostic catheterization.

Recently, doctors across the country have been slower to implant stents, instead relying on drugs to treat heart artery blockages. Medicare has also questioned the need for patients who receive cardiac stents to stay overnight at the hospital, cutting into the profitability of the procedures for many hospitals.

The Pressure is on to Root Out Medicare Fraud in All Hospitals.

The need to root out Medicare fraud is high for all hospitals, but the pressure on HCA is even greater. In 2000, the company reached one of a series of settlements involving a huge Medicare fraud case with the DOJ that would eventually come to $1.7 billion in fines and repayments. The accusations, which primarily involved overbilling, occurred when Rick Scott, Florida’s current governor, was the company’s chief executive. He was removed from the post by the board, but was never personally accused of wrongdoing.

As part of the settlement with federal regulators, HCA signed a Corporate Integrity Agreement that extended through late 2008. It detailed what had to be reported to authorities and outlined stiffer penalties if HCA failed to do so.

If there were intentional violations of such an agreement, it would mean “that a defendant, already caught once defrauding the government, has apparently not changed its corporate culture,” said Michael Hirst, a former assistant U.S. attorney in California in an interview with The New York Times.

To read the press release on HCA’s Corporate Integrity Agreement, click here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Handling Medicare Audits.

Medicare fraud is a serious crime and is vigorously investigated by the FBI and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Office of Inspector General (OIG). Don’t wait until it’s too late. If you are concerned of any possible violations and would like a confidential consultation, contact a qualified health attorney familiar with medical billing and audits today.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent physicians, hospitals, medical groups, clinics, pharmacies, ambulance services companies, durable medical equipment (DME) suppliers, home health agencies, nursing homes and other healthcare providers in Medicaid and Medicare investigations, audits and recovery actions.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Creswell, Julie and Abelson, Reed. “HCA Discloses U.S. Inquiry Into Cardiology Services.” The New York Times. (August 6, 2012). From: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/07/business/hca-discloses-us-inquiry-into-cardiology-services.html

Murphy, Tom. “Justice Department Probes HCA Cardiology Care.” The Associated Press. (August 6, 2012). From: http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5gXsDjWtOXgsrT_PKj5y-gwAyQCjg?docId=8cf91ec16d54407db6f93634099daef6

HCA. (August 6, 2012). From: http://hcahealthcare.com/util/documents/Information_Regarding_NYT_Story_080612.pdf

Justice.gov. “HCA -The Health Care Company & Subsidiaries to Pay $840 Million in Criminal Fines and Civil Damages and Penalties.” Department of Justice. (December 2000). Press Release From: http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2000/December/696civcrm.htm

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

August 27, 2012, Marks the Start Date of the CMS Recovery Audit Prepayment Review (RAPR)

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On July 31, 2012, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced on its website that hospitals should brace themselves for prepayment audits beginning August 27, 2012.

The CMS originally announced the Recovery Audit Prepayment Review (RAPR) Demonstration Project in November of 2011 for a January 1, 2012 start date, then delayed it to June 1, 2012, then again to, “summer of 2012.”

To see the official announcement from the CMS, click here.

 

Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) will Review Claims with High Rates of Improper Billing.

The Recovery Audit Prepayment Review allows Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs), (commonly known to attorneys representing provers as “bounty hunters”) to review claims before they are paid to ensure that the provider has complied with all Medicare payment rules. RACs will conduct prepayment reviews on certain types of claims that have been found to result in high rates of improper payments. The goal is to cut improper payments before they even happen.

The Initial Launch of Recovery Audit Prepayment Reviews will Center Around Seven States.

The Recovery Audit Prepayment Reviews will focus on seven states with high volumes of fraud and error-prone providers. These states are: California, Florida, Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan, New York, and Texas. The Recovery Audit Prepayment Reviews will also include four states with a high volume of claim with short inpatient hospital stays. These states are Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.

Here are the RACs for those states from the CMS:

HealthDataInsights serves California and Missouri
7501 Trinity Peak Street, Suite 120
Las Vegas, NV 89128
(866) 590-5598

Connolly Inc. serves Florida, Louisiana, Texas, and North Carolina
One Crescent Drive, Suite 300-A
Philadelphia, PA 19112
(866) 360-2507

CGI Federal Inc. serves Illinois, Michigan, and Ohio
1001 Lakeside Ave., Suite 800
Cleveland, OH 44114
(877) 316-RACB

Diversified Collection Services serves New York and Pennsylvania
2819 Southwest Blvd
San Angelo, TX 76904
(866) 201-0580

To see the name of the RAC for your state, click here.

 

More States May Look to Be Included in the Recovery Audit Prepayment Review Demonstration Project.

CMS is expecting that the prepayment reviews will help lower error rates by preventing improper payments instead of searching for improper payments after they occur. If these reviews are successful, other states will be included in subsequent roll-outs of the Recovery Audit Prepayment Review Demonstration.

 

Goals for the Recovery Audit Prepayment Review Demonstration.

In 2012, President Obama set three goals for cutting improper payments this year: curbing overall payment errors by $50 billion, cutting Medicare error rate in half and recovering $2 billion in improper payments, according to CMS. The prepayment review program is intended to help achieve those goals. It will also play a big part in preventing fraud, waste and abuse.

The demonstration project will last for three years.

Click here to learn more on the Recover Audit Prepayment Review Demostration.
 

My Concerns with Widespread Prepayment Reviews.

Our concerns with the widespread use of prepayment reviews are many. Prepayment reviews, especially when used where there is no indication of any fraud or a high error rate, can slow down a health provider’s cash flow to the point that it is put out of business. This is especially true for those that are predominately reimbursed by Medicare. The small business provider is at a greater risk.

In addition, the increase in professional time, salaries, copy costs, handling costs and postage greatly increase the administrative burden and the cost of doing business. To date, we have not seen or heard of any proposal by CMS to reimburse the provider for this additional unnecessary and unplanned expense.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Handling Medicaid and Medicare Audits.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent physicians, medical groups, clinics, pharmacies, durable medical equipment (DME) suppliers, home health agencies, nursing homes and other healthcare providers in Medicaid and Medicare investigations, audits and recovery actions.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.
Sources:

Cheung, Karen. “Prepayment Audits Start Aug. 27.” Fierce Healthcare. (July 31, 2012). From: http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/story/prepayment-audits-start-aug-27/2012-07-31

CMS.gov. “Recovery Audit Prepayment Review.” CMS.gov. (July 31, 2012). From: https://www.cms.gov/Research-Statistics-Data-and-Systems/Monitoring-Programs/CERT/Demonstrations.html

 

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.