Tag Archives: medical license

Human Body Parts Discovered in Self-Storage Facility that Belonged to a Former Medical Examiner

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A former medical examiner, who is accused of keeping the body parts of more than 100 people in his Pensacola storage facility, was arrested September 7, 2012. He now faces a felony charge of improper storage of hazardous waste, a misdemeanor charge of “nuisance injurious to public health” and driving with a suspended license, according to a number of sources.

To see the case against the former medical examiner, click here.

It is reported that he had previously been fired as a medical examiner in Jackson County, Missouri. His medical license was allegedly revoked in Missouri. A check of the Florida Department of Health (DOH) licensing website lists his license as null and void. To see his license verification, click here. He could also have some serious points added to his driving license, making his auto insurance premiums go up (if convicted of the traffic offense).

Livers, Brains and Hearts Allegedly Found in Storage Facility.

According to an article in the Pensacola News Journal, the former medical examiner rented the self-storage unit for about three years. On August 22, 2012, he defaulted on his payments, and the unit was auctioned off.

When the storage facility was auctioned off, the new purchaser allegedly discovered 10 cardboard boxes containing human remains stored in a liquid. Garbage bags containing human remains packaged in soda cups and plastic food containers were also found.

This is one auction I doubt you are going to see on “Auction Hunters” or “Storage Wars” on television.

According to a related Associated Press article, the District 1 Medical Examiner’s Office in Pensacola said that the remains appear to have come from private autopsies that were performed between 1997 and 2007 at funeral homes in the Florida Panhandle and in Tallahassee. Allegedly 111 containers filled with body parts, including hearts, brains, a liver, and a lung were found.

Although there were lots of brains found, there were no “Abbie Normal” brains reportedly found.

For a related story regarding zombie outbreaks in Florida and the Florida Legislature’s effort to control them by banning bath salts, click here.

Former Medical Examiner Fired from Medical Examiner’s Office in Pensacola.

The former medical examiner reportedly worked at the District 1 Medical Examiner’s Office in Pensacola from 1997 to 2003. He was fired for allegedly having a large backlog of cases and failing to complete autopsy reports in a timely manner.

Investigation Continues.

Right now, the former medical examiner faces a felony charge of improper storage of hazardous waste, a misdemeanor charge of “nuisance injurious to public health” and driving with a suspended license. These charges alone could land him in prison for more than five years. 

The District 1 Medical Examiner’s Office in Pensacola is contacting all the family members of the decedents whose body parts were found. If the family did not give permission to the former doctor, more charges could be coming. Exactly how these body parts are being identified has not been made clear.

Click here to read the entire Pensacola News Journal article.

Your Thoughts?

Tell us below what you think of this story. We would love to hear from you.


Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, license complaints, administrative hearings, business and commercial litigation, and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Heisig, Eric. “Charges Filed Against Doctor in Body Parts Cases.” Pensacola News Journal. (September 9, 2012). From: http://www.pnj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2012309080010

Associated Press. “Ex-Medical Examiner Charged After Human Organs Found in Storage Unit.” Associated Press (September 8, 2012). From: http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2012-09-08/news/os-human-organs-storage-unit-florida-20120908_1_human-organs-storage-unit-medical-examiner

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

Doctor Voluntarily Relinquishes License Due to Allegations of Malpractice and Over-Prescribing Oxycodone

By Danielle M. Murray, J.D., Attorney, The Health Law Firm

A doctor in Polk County, Florida, has lost his license to practice medicine. Rather than risk having his license revoked in an administrative proceeding, the now former doctor offered to voluntarily relinquish his license. The Florida Board of Medicine voted to accept the voluntary relinquishment on Friday, August 3, 2012, according to a Lakeland Ledger article.

Click here to read the entire Lakeland Ledger article.

Doctor Nabbed in Sting Operation for Allegedly Prescribing Oxycodone to Undercover Agents.

The article states the doctor from Winter Haven was nabbed in a sting operation in 2010 after allegedly providing prescriptions for oxycodone to undercover police officers without actually performing a valid medical examination. The physician allegedly pled no contest to trafficking oxycodone and illegal delivery of a controlled substance. He is currently awaiting sentencing for his offenses, which may result in three to seven years in prison, along with five years of probation, and mental health counseling.

He was also a named suspect in the deaths of five patients who allegedly overdosed on the medications. Prosecutors decided not to pursue homicide charges.

Doctor Also Faces Malpractice Investigation.

The doctor, who practiced internal medicine, also faced a malpractice investigation by the Florida Department of Health (DOH). According to the DOH, he is accused of mismanagement of a former patient’s care. That patient allegedly developed an aggressive form of prostate cancer as a result. A subsequent doctor who treated the patient ordered a biopsy and diagnosed the patient with prostate cancer that was far advanced.

To read the entire case from the DOH, click here.

Reasons to Not Voluntarily Relinquish a Medical License.

We almost always counsel our clients to refrain from voluntarily relinquishing their medical licenses in such circumstances. A voluntary relinquishment of a license in the face of a pending investigation is treated, for all practical purposes, the same as a disciplinary revocation.

The consequences will usually include:

 1. Mandatory report to the National Practitioner Data Base (NPDB) (Note:  Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank or HIPDB recently folded into NPDB) which remains there for 50 years.

 2. Any other states or jurisdictions in which the client has a license will also initiate action against him or her in that jurisdiction.  (Note:  I have had two clients who had licenses in seven other states).

 3. Action to revoke, suspend or take other action against the clinical privileges and medical staff membership of those licensed health professionals who may have such in a hospital, ambulatory surgical center, skilled nursing facility, or staff model HMO or clinic.

 4. The OIG of HHS will take action to exclude the provider from the Medicare Program.  If this occurs (and most of these offense require mandatory exclusion) the provider will be placed on the List of Excluded Individuals and Entities (LEIE) maintained by the HHS OIG.

 5. If the above occurs, the provider is also automatically “debarred” or prohibited from participating in any capacity in any federal contracting and is placed on the U.S. General Services Administration’s (GSA’s) debarment list.

 6. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will act to revoke the professional’s DEA registration if he or she has one.

 7. The board certified health professional’s certifying organization will act to revoke his or her certification.

For more reasons why a health care provider should not relinquish a professional license, click here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Health Care Providers in DOH Cases.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses, and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the DEA, Department of Health (DOH), and other law enforcement agencies.

If you are aware of an investigation of you or your practice, or if you have been contacted by the DEA or DOH, contact an experienced health law attorney immediately.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Adams, Robin. “Two Polk Doctors Relinquish Licenses to Board of Medicine.” Lakeland Ledger. (August 3, 2012). From: http://www.theledger.com/article/20120803/NEWS/120809775?tc=ar

Adams, Robin. “Winter Haven Doctor Faces Medical Board Action for Trafficking in Oxycodone.” Lakeland Ledger. (August 2, 2012). From: http://www.theledger.com/article/20120802/NEWS/120809855/1001/BUSINESS?Title=Winter-Haven-Doctor-Faces-Medical-Board-Action-for-Trafficking-in-Oxycodone

Pleasant, Matthew. “Winter Haven Doctor Won’t Face Murder Charges in Overdose Deaths.” Lakeland Ledger. (March 29, 2011). From:

http://www.theledger.com/article/20110329/NEWS/110329349

Fields, Tammie. “Dr. Ernesto Juan Perez Arrested, Named Murder Suspect.” WTSP. (October 29, 2010). From: http://www.wtsp.com/news/topstories/story.aspx?storyid=153540

Aycrigga, George. “Drug Sting Nabs Dr. Perez; Oxycodone Charges Filed.” News Chief. (October 30,2010). From: http://www.newschief.com/article/20101030/news/10305009

About the Author: Danielle M. Murray is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

New Anti-Prescription Drug Abuse Campaign in Pinellas County

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Pinellas County has started a new billboard campaign aimed at curbing prescription drug abuse. The billboard message reads, “We’re shutting down Pill Mills in Pinellas County.” The first two billboards were erected on April 1, 2012. Several smaller boards will be put up in the next few weeks, with even more planned for the future. This continues the long-standing battle by Pinellas County law enforcement authorities against pain management clinics that they describe as “pill mills.”  Pinellas County includes the cities of St. Petersburg, Clearwater and Seminole.

The billboard message is a statement from local coalition groups who have partnered with Pinellas County in order to curb the area’s prescription drug abuse problem. In 2010, Pinellas County allegedly had the most occurrences of accidental overdose deaths from prescription drugs when compared to all other counties in Florida.

The intention of Pinellas County in establishing this billboard campaign may be aimed at stopping prescription drug abuse, but the billboards also shed negative light on legitimate pain management clinics and physicians. Although anti-prescription drug abuse campaigns are laudable, these efforts should focus on assisting those with actual prescription drug abuse history, rather than creating a scapegoat out of the pain management industry.

If you work in the pain management industry (physician, pharmacist, pain clinic, pharmacy, etc.) and feel that your medical license, pharmacy license, or business is at risk or is under investigation by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) or Florida Department of Health (DOH), please visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com for more information about this.

Sources Include:

WFTS Staff, “County Sends Billboard-sized Message About Prescription Drug Abuse,”  ABC Action News (Apr. 6, 2012).  From:  http://www.abcactionnews.com/dpp/news/state/county-sends-billboard-sized-message-about-prescription-drug-abuse

“We’re Shutting Down Pill Mills in Pinellas County,” Tampa Bay Newspapers (Apr. 10, 2012). From:  http://www.tbnweekly.com/pinellas_county/content_articles/041012_pco-01.txt

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com

At Last, a Ray of Hope for Florida Health Professionals Who Have Paid Their Debt to Society After Criminal Conviction

The Florida Legislature unanimously passed HB 653 which relaxes some of the draconian exclusions enacted under SB 1986, which went into effect on July 1, 2009. SB 1986, which added provisions to Chapter 456, Florida Statutes, among others, prevented numerous healthcare providers from obtaining or renewing licenses based on prior criminal convictions, which could have occurred decades earlier.

As of this writing (March 16, 2012), HB 653 has been passed unanimously by the Florida Legislature, but awaits the Governor’s signature.

Under HB 653, the professional boards within the Department of Health (such as the Board of Medicine, Board of Nursing, Board of Psychology, Board of Massage Therapy, etc.) now will, if signed by the Governor, only prohibit the renewal or granting of a health professional’s license, certificate or registration, if the individual:

1. Has been convicted of, or entered a plea of guilty or no contest to, regardless of adjudication, a felony under Chapters 409 (Medicaid offenses), 817 (theft or fraud) or 893 (drug offenses), Florida Statutes, or similar laws in other jurisdictions, unless the individual successfully completed a drug court program for the felony and provides proof that the plea was withdrawn or the charges were dismissed, or unless the sentence and any related period of probation for such conviction or plea ended:

– For first and second degree felonies, more than fifteen (15) years before the date of application;

– For third degree felonies, more than ten (10) years before the date of application, except for third degree felonies under Section 893.13(6)(a), Florida Statutes; and

– For third degree felonies under Section 893.13(6)(a), Florida Statutes, more than five (5) years before the date of application.

2. Has been convicted of, or entered a plea of guilty or no contest to, regardless of adjudication, a felony under 21 U.S.C. Sections 801-970 or 42 U.S.C. Sections 1395-1396 (federal Medicare & Medicaid offenses), unless the sentence and any subsequent period of probation for such convictions or plea ended more than fifteen (15) years before the date of application; or

3. Is listed on the OIG’s list of excluded individuals and entities.

This new legislation has the effect of reducing the period of time a health professional may be prohibited from holding a license because of a conviction for one of the enumerated felonies. Under the current law, there is a fifteen (15) year prohibition for all enumerated offenses. The new legislation, if signed, will reduce the period to as little as five (5) years for drug offenses.

However, it also broadens the reach of the current Florida law by including, for the first time, convictions under “similar laws in other jurisdictions.” This may now “catch” many to whom the Florida law did not previously apply.

HB 653 also allows individuals previously denied renewals under SB 1986 who at are now eligible for renewal to obtain a license without retaking and passing their examinations.

The latter requirement above, number 3, may present a “catch 22” for many health professionals. Usually, if a licensed health professional is convicted of a felony, loses his/her license or is denied renewal of a health professional’s license, this is reported to the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB). The NPDB now includes reports previously made to the Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank (HIPDB). If this occurs, in most cases the Office of Inspector General (OIG) commences action to exclude the professional from the Medicare Program. This automatically places the health provider’s name on the OIG’s List of Excluded Individuals and Entities (LEIE). Therefore, most licensed health professionals, even if they are no longer prohibited from holding a license under numbers 1 and 2 above, may still be prohibited because of requirement number 3 above.

Doubtless, this lacuna (gap) in this legislation will require additional corrective legislation in the future.

As previously indicated, HB 653 is currently (March 16, 2012) awaiting the Governor’s signature.

The Collateral Effects of a Criminal Case on a Health Care Licensee

Criminal charges against a health care professional can have serious consequences. Learn more about the impact of a criminal charge on Florida licensed health professionals. For further information, visit our website.

What is the Effect of a Plea of Nolo Contendere for a Florida Licensed Health Professional?

Pursuant to the general chapter of Florida Statutes applicable to all licensed health professionals (Chapter 456), a plea of nolo contendere is treated the same as a plea of guilty for all purposes.  Additionally the chapter of Florida Statutes that governs each type of health professional usually contains similar provisions;  sometimes this will be in the Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.) Rules that have been adopted by the separate professional licensing board for that profession.

What Is the Effect of an Adjudication or Finding of Adjudication Withheld?

Pursuant to the general chapter of Florida Statutes applicable to all licensed health professionals (Chapter 456), an adjudication or finding of adjudication withheld (or “adjudication deferred” in some jurisdictions) is treated the same as a finding of guilty for all purposes.  Additionally the chapter of Florida Statutes that governs each type of health professional usually contains similar provisions;  sometimes this will be in the Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.) Rules that have been adopted by the separate professional licensing board for that profession.

When must a Licensed Health Professional Report Guilty Pleas (Nolo Plea or Guilty Plea) and Convictions (Adjudication Withheld or Finding of Guilty) to the Florida Department of Health?

Any guilty plea (as defined above as a nolo plea or guilty plea) or any adjudication of guilt (as defined above as adjudication withheld or finding of guilty) of any crime must be reported  by the health professional to his or her professional licensing board (or the Department of Health when there is no board) within thirty (30) days of the conviction or finding.  Section 456.072(1)(x), Florida Statutes.

In Florida, all health professionals licensed or regulated under Chapter 456 of Florida Statutes, are required to report to their professional board (or the Florida Department of Health if there is no professional board in their profession) any convictions or findings of guilty of criminal offenses, in any jurisdiction.  Unfortunately, pursuant to Florida Statutes, a plea of nolo contendere must be reported just as a plea of guilty to an offense (a plea of not guilty does not need to be reported).  A finding of guilty or a finding of adjudication withheld (also called a “withhold” or “deferred adjudication” in some jurisdictions) must also be reported (a finding of not guilty, a dismissal, a nolle prosequi, pretrial diversion or pretrial intervention program in almost all cases dose not have to be reported).

Licensed practitioners who also are required to have a profile with the Department of Health (e.g., physicians licensed under Chapters 458, 459, 460 or 461), must submit an update to their profile, including criminal convictions, within fifteen (15) days of the “final activity that renders such information a fact.”  Section 456.042, Florida Statutes.

For example, a doctor of medicine (M.D.), licensed pursuant to chapter 458, Florida Statutes, must submit an update to the physician’s profile within fifteen (15) days.  A registered respiratory therapist, on the other hand, doesn’t have a profile.  The registered respiratory therapist would have to report  a matter qualifying with the above within thirty (30) days to his or her board, the Board of Respiratory Care.  (A finding of not guilty, a dismissal, a nolle prosequi, pretrial diversion or pretrial intervention program in almost all cases dose not have to be reported).

As with any such important legal matter, we recommend reporting in a typed, professional letter, via a reliable method of delivery which provides tracking and delivers you a receipt.  We do not consider e-mail to be reliable or susceptible of verification or tracking.  We usually recommend reporting such matters via U.S. Express Mail, with a return receipt requested.  Be sure to keep copies of the correspondence, the receipt of mailing and the return receipt, to document reporting and delivery dates, and to prove receipt.

Always consult the latest versions of the Florida Statutes and the Rules of the Department of Health and your professional board to make sure you have the correct information.  We recommend retaining a health attorney familiar with the Department of Health and its regulatory processes, as such a report will usually require the Department of Health to commence an investigation of the health professional, even if the health professional is located in another state.

Which Crimes May Result in an Automatic Bar to Licensure?

Senate Bill 1984, effective July 1, 2009, amended various section of Florida Statutes, including sections of Chapter 456.  These amendments prohibit the Department of Health from granting a new license to or granting the renewal of a license to a health professional because of a guilty plea or conviction of certain offenses.  This is also grounds for revocation of the health professional’s license.

Generally, as set forth in Section 456.0635(2)(a), Florida Statutes these are:

Being convicted of, or entering a plea of guilty or nolo contendere to, regardless of adjudication, a felony under:

    • Chapter 409 (the Medicaid Program)
    • Chapter 817 (Fraud)
    • Chapter 893 (Drugs)
    • 21 U.S.C. Sects. 801-970 (Food and Drugs);  or
    • 42 U.S.C. Sects. 1395-1396 (Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security)

unless the sentence and any subsequent period of probation for such conviction or pleas ended more than 15 years prior to the date of the application.  (Sect. 456.0635(2)(a), Fla. Stat.)

Additionally, grounds for discipline against the existing license of health professional includes:

    • Any misdemeanor or felony relating to Medicaid fraud:  “Being convicted of, or entering a plea of guilty or nolo contendere to, any misdemeanor or felony, regardless of adjudication, under 18 U.S.C. Sect. 669, Sects. 285-287, Sect. 371, Sect. 1001, Sect. 1035, Sect. 1341, Sect. 1343, Sect. 1347, Sect. 1349, or Sect. 1518, or 42 U.S.C. Sects. 1320a-7b, relating to the Medicaid program.”  (Sect. 456.072(1)(ii), Fla. Stat.
    • Being convicted of, or entering a plea of guilty or nolo contendere to, any misdemeanor or felony, regardless of adjudication, a crime in any jurisdiction which relates to health care fraud.  (Sect. 456.072(1)(ll), Fla. Stat.

Defense Strategies and Avoidances

    • Plead to some offense or offenses other than the ones listed above.
    • Avoid a felony conviction;  misdemeanors do not prohibit licensure or renewal, but may result in disciplinary action.
    • Avoid any offenses that sound like “health fraud,” “Medicaid fraud” or “Medicare fraud.”
    • Violations of other states’ laws don’t count;  just Florida’s and federal listed above (caveat).
    • Attempt to obtain pre-trial diversion, pre-trial intervention or drug court.
    • Attempt to avoid having to enter a guilty plea or nolo plea.
    • Attempt to include in settlement agreement/plea bargain agreement/stipulation that client may apply to have record sealed immediately upon completion of requirements and State will not object.
    • Advise client to immediately apply for sealing of record when all requirements of probation are met.
    • Obtain input from a board certified health lawyer or other “expert” as to the disproportionate effect (all of the collateral consequences) that a “conviction” may have on the licensed health professional.

What Are the Collateral Effects of “Conviction” of above Offenses?

  1. A case involving an arrest or a conviction involving alcohol abuse (DUI/public Intoxication) or drugs (possession, diversion, theft, trafficking) will probably result in an emergency suspension order (ESO) until entire licensure case is complete.
  2. Client may be required to be evaluated and probably enrolled in the Impaired Nurses Program (IPN) (for nurses only) or the Professionals Resource Network (PRN) (for all other licensed health professionals), which is usually at least a five year contract.
  3. Action to revoke, suspend or take other action against the clinical privileges and medical staff membership of those licensed health professionals who may have such in a hospital, ambulatory surgical center, skilled nursing facility, or staff model HMO or clinic.  This will usually be physicians, physician assistants (PAs), advance registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs), podiatrists, clinical psychologists and clinical pharmacists.
  4. Mandatory report to the National Practitioner Data Base (NPDB) (Note:  Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank or HIPDB recently folded into NPDB) which remains there for 50 years.
  5. Must be reported to and included in the DOH profile that is available to the public online (for those having one), and remains for at least ten years.
  6. Any other states or jurisdictions in which the client has a license will also initiate action against him or her in that jurisdiction.  (Note:  I have had two clients who had licenses in seven other states).
  7. The OIG of HHS will take action to exclude the provider from the Medicare Program.  If this occurs (and most of these offense require mandatory exclusion) the provider will be placed on the List of Excluded Individuals and Entities (LEIE) maintained by the HHS OIG.
  8. If the above occurs, the provider is also automatically “debarred” or prohibited from participating in any capacity in any federal contracting and is placed on the U.S. General Services Administration’s (GSA’s) debarment list.
  9. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will act to revoke the professional’s DEA registration if he or she has one.
  10. The certified health professional’s certify organization will act to revoke his or her certification.
  11. Third party payors (health insurance companies, HMOs, etc.) will terminate the professional’s contract or panel membership with that organization.
  12. Any profile maintained by a national organization or federation (e.g., American Medical Association physician profile or Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy profile) will include the conviction.
  13. Regardless of any of the above, any facility licensed by AHCA (hospitals, skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), public health clinics, public health clinics, group homes for the developmentally disabled, etc.) that are required to perform background screenings on their employees will result in AHCA notifying the facility and the professional that he or she is disqualified from employment.