Tag Archives: healthcare fraud

“Doctor of Death” Trial Could Ignite Stricter Oversight in the Healthcare Industry

8 Indest-2008-5By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On paper, one Detroit-area oncologist appeared to be a wildly successful professional with impeccable medical credentials. According to his medical practice’s website, he went to medical school at Cornell Medical College, did an internal medicine residency at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York, and then completed a medical oncology fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, a very well-respected facility. The oncologist ran a professional practice of seven locations with a total of 60 employees.

However, on September 24, 2014, his reputation and accolades faded when he pleaded guilty to intentionally and wrongfully diagnosing healthy patients with cancer. He also admitted to giving these patients chemotherapy solely for the purpose of making a profit.

For healthcare professionals, this act is an obvious violation of the oath they took to serve their patients and to do no harm. But, if this oncologist is found guilty, you can be assured that oncologists, physicians, dentists, and all other healthcare professionals will be under a microscope to help ensure that something this egregious and dishonest does not happen again.

Allegations Against the Oncologist.

The details of the allegations, obtained from various employee whistleblowers, range from the mundane to the horrific. In the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) complaint against the oncologist, there are dozens of examples of his wrongdoing described. The activities of which the doctor is accused include:

– Administration of unnecessary chemotherapy to patients in remission;
– Deliberate misdiagnosis of patients as having cancer to justify unnecessary cancer treatment;
– Administration of chemotherapy to end-of-life patients who would not benefit from the treatment;
– Deliberate misdiagnosis of patients without cancer to justify expensive testing;
– Fabrication of other diagnoses such as anemia and fatigue to justify unnecessary hematology treatments; and
– Distribution of controlled substances to patients without medical necessity.

There is also an issue of Medicare fraud. For the past six years, the doctor is accused of seeing a large number of patients per day. He would then bill every patient at the highest possible billing code, even though he allegedly only spent a few minutes with each patient. The amount of money related to the doctor’s Medicare fraud scheme is a staggering $35 million.

Click here to read the FBI’s complaint against the oncologist.

Charges.

The oncologist is facing a an abundance of legal issues. In all, the oncologist pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to 13 counts of healthcare fraud, one count of conspiracy to pay or receive kickbacks and two counts of money laundering. He will be sentenced in February 2015 and faces up to 175 years in prison.

Other Healthcare Providers Could Pay for Oncologist’s Greed.

If the oncologist is found guilty, the aftereffects will surely be felt throughout the industry. For example, healthcare providers will need to more closely watch their Medicare billing. Any reimbursement submitted to Medicare will be under tight scrutiny. Keep in mind that Medicare pays close attention to the percentage of patients billed at each level. If a physician bills for every patient at the highest level, it’s going to send up a huge red flag. If you or your practice is being audited, click here for some tips on responding to a Medicare audit.

On top of the extensive healthcare fraud charges, the oncologist allegedly misled, endangered, and injured his patients. He betrayed the trust and privilege given to him as a physician by society, all in the name of greed. According to an article in The Washington Post, more than one patient died under the care of the oncologist. These families are now left to figure out whether their loved ones actually had cancer and died of chemotherapy complications, or whether they died of an actual cancerous ailment.

It’s crucial to remember that cutting corners to make a profit as a healthcare professional leads to great ramifications. Once a healthcare professional’s license and reputation are questioned, it is not an industry one can easily get back into.

Comments?

In your opinion, what is the worst offense this oncologist allegedly committed? Explain. Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in accusations of disruptive behavior, Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Sullivan, Gail. “‘Death Doctor’ Who Profited from Unnecessary Chemotherapy for Fake Cancers Could Resume Practice in 5 Years.” The Washington Post. (October 1, 2014). From: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2014/10/01/death-doctor-who-profited-from-unnecessary-chemotherapy-for-fake-cancers-could-resume-practice-in-three-years/

“Prominent Michigan Cancer Doctor Pleads Guilty: ‘I Knew That It Was Medically Unnecessary’.” The Inquisitr. (September 24, 2014). From: http://www.inquisitr.com/1485160/prominent-michigan-cancer-doctor-pleads-guilty-i-knew-that-it-was-medically-unnecessary/

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

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Copying and Pasting Clinical Notes in Electronic Health Records Could Be Considered Healthcare Fraud

1 Indest-2008-1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Inspector General (OIG) is concerned about healthcare providers carelessly copying and pasting clinical notes in electronic health records (EHRs). According to an audit report released on December 10, 2013, copying and pasting in EHRs can lead to fraudulently duplicated clinical notes, which can be considered healthcare fraud. This practice is allegedly widespread across medicine, according to a Modern Healthcare article. Federal officials say there is a need to crackdown on this behavior.

Click here to read the entire audit report from the HHS OIG.

This is the first of two reports on fraud and vulnerabilities in EHR systems. The second report from the OIG will be on weaknesses in how the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (CMS) payment contractors monitor for fraud in EHRs. This report is scheduled to be published soon.

Report Looks at Hospital Policies Regarding Copy-and-Paste Features.

The audit report studied 864 hospitals that had received subsidies for EHR systems as of March 2012. Out of those hospitals, only twenty-four percent (24%) had any policy regarding the improper use of copying-and-pasting in EHRs. The report concluded that too few hospitals actually have policies defining the proper use of copy and paste in EHRs.

According to Modern Healthcare, adoption of EHR systems has coincided with a rapid rise in higher-cost Medicare claims. This has led to officials looking into whether EHRs are enabling illegal upcoding. Officials say that EHR features such as copy and paste make it too easy to bill for work that wasn’t actually performed and help increase reimbursements, according to Modern Healthcare. Click here to read the entire article from Modern Healthcare.

In the report the HHS OIG recommends that the CMS strengthen its efforts to develop a comprehensive plan to address fraud vulnerabilities in EHRs. It was also suggested that CMS develop guidance on the use of the copy-paste feature in EHR technology.

Tips to Help Avoid Copy-and-Paste Errors.

Tools commonly available in EHRs that allow physicians to copy and paste patient information should be used with extreme care, according to an article on American Medical News. The article offers health care providers some guidelines to help avoid errors related to copying and pasting.

– Avoid copying and pasting of text from another person’s notes.

– Avoid repetitive copying and pasting of laboratory results and radiology reports.

– Note important results with proper context, and document any resulting actions. Avoid wholesale inclusion of information readily available elsewhere in the EHR because that creates clutter and may adversely affect note readability.

– Review and update as appropriate any shared information found elsewhere in the electronic record (e.g., problems, allergies, medications) that is included in a note.

– Include previous history critical to longitudinal care in the outpatient setting, as long as it is always reviewed and updated. Copying and pasting other elements of the history, physical examination or formulations is risky, as errors in editing may jeopardize the credibility of the entire note.

Click here to read the entire article from American Medical News.

What This Means for Healthcare Providers Using EHRs.

The practice of copying and pasting previous information without checking can be considered careless and potentially dangerous to patients. It can be problematic when there are multiple teams taking care of one patient and using the chart to communicate. The right way is to make sure everything in the note you sign accurately reflects what happened on your shift.

In the report the HHS OIG stated that copy-and-paste features in EHRs will be under additional scrutiny. By knowing where the enforcement focus will be, providers can attempt to avoid copy-and-paste practices that are likely to lead to audits. Additionally, providers can beef up compliance efforts and policies.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Handling Medicare and Medicaid Audits, Investigations and other Legal Proceedings.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm represent healthcare providers in Medicare audits, ZPIC audits and RAC audits throughout Florida and across the U.S. They also represent physicians, medical groups, nursing homes, home health agencies, pharmacies, hospitals and other healthcare providers and institutions in Medicare and Medicaid investigations, audits, recovery actions and termination from the Medicare or Medicaid Program.

Don’t wait until it’s too late. If you are concerned of any possible violations and would like a consultation, contact a qualified health attorney familiar with medical billing and audits today. To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

In your practice do you use an EHR system? Have you had any issues with copying and pasting clinical notes? Does your practice have a copy-and-paste policy? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.|

Sources:

Carlson, Joe. “Fed Eye Crackdown on Cut-and-Paste EHR Fraud.” Modern Healthcare. (December 10, 2013). From: http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20131210/NEWS/312109965/cut-and-paste-function-can-invite-ehr-fraud-officials-say

O’Reilly, Kevin. “EHRs: ‘Sloppy and Paste’ Endures Despite Patient Safety Risk.” American Medical News. (February 4, 2013). From: http://www.amednews.com/article/20130204/profession/130209993/2/

Levinson, Daniel R. “Not All Recommended Fraud Safeguards Have Been Implemented in Hospital EHR Technology.” Department of Health and Humans Services Office of Inspector General. (December 2013). From: http://www.modernhealthcare.com/assets/pdf/CH92135129.PDF

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

CMS Fights Medicare Fraud With Ban on New Home Health Agencies and Ambulance Suppliers in Three Cities

LOL Blog Label 2

By Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced it will temporarily ban new home health providers and ambulance suppliers from enrolling in Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in three fraud “hot spots.” According to CMS, the six-month moratorium begins July 30, 2013. It applies to newly enrolling home health agencies (HHAs) in Miami, Florida, and Chicago, Illinois. It also applies to newly enrolling ambulance suppliers in Houston, Texas. Existing providers and suppliers can continue to deliver and bill for services. The goal of the ban is to fight healthcare fraud.

Click here to read the press release from CMS.

Authority to impose a moratorium was included in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). According to a summary of the anti-fraud provisions in the Affordable Care Act, the Act allows CMS to prohibit new providers from joining the program where necessary to prevent or fight fraud, waste or abuse in certain geographic areas or for certain categories of services. This is the first time CMS is exercising its authority.

Why Moratorium Was Imposed in These Areas.

According to CMS, the decision to impose the moratorium was based on a number of factors, including a disproportional number of providers and suppliers relative to beneficiaries, a quick increase in enrollment applications from providers and suppliers, and extremely high utilization in these areas.

Miami Area a Hot Bed for Healthcare Fraud and Abuse.

The Miami area has stood out as one of the nation’s hubs of Medicare fraud, according to CMS. For example, in May 2013, a Miami patient recruiter for an HHA was sentenced to 37 months in prison for participating in a $20 million Medicare fraud scheme. Click here to read a previous blog. In that same month, workers from a Miami-area HHA were accused of bribing Medicare beneficiaries for their Medicare information, which was used to bill for home health services that were never rendered or not medically necessary. To read more, click here.

According to the Miami Herald, with a large number of elderly Medicare beneficiaries living in Miami, it’s not a surprise that healthcare fraud is so prevalent. South Florida allegedly accounts for one-third (1/3) of all healthcare fraud prosecutions in the nation. Click here to read the entire Miami Herald article.

The Affordable Care Act Offers the Government New Tools to Fight Healthcare Fraud.

In 2011 and 2012, the government reported recovery of $14.9 billion in healthcare fraud judgments, settlements and administrative impositions, according to CMS. In addition, CMS has revoked 14,663 providers and suppliers’ ability to bill the Medicare Program since 2011. The Affordable Care Act seeks to improve anti-fraud and abuse measures by focusing on prevention rather than the traditional “pay-and-chase” model of catching crooks after they have committed fraud. Click here to read a blog on the Affordable Care Act’s other fraud fighting tools.

What This Means for Health Care Professionals and Providers.

By knowing the government is beefing up measures to fight healthcare fraud, providers can attempt to avoid practices that are likely to lead to Zone Program Integrity Contractor (ZPIC) or Recovery Audit Contractor (RAC) audits. Additionally, a provider can be prepared for potential audits by increasing its documentation and compliance efforts.

Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late; Consult with a Health Law Attorney Experienced in Medicare and Medicaid Issues Now.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm represent healthcare providers in Medicare audits, ZPIC audits and RAC audits throughout Florida and across the U.S. They also represent physicians, medical groups, nursing homes, home health agencies, pharmacies, hospitals and other healthcare providers and institutions in Medicare and Medicaid investigations, audits, recovery actions and termination from the Medicare or Medicaid Program.
For more information please visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com or call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001.

Comments?

What do you think of CMS’ decision to invoke the moratorium? Do you think this should have been done sooner? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. “CMS Imposes First Affordable Care Act Enrollment Moratoria to Combat Fraud.” CMS.gov. (July 26, 2013). From: http://www.cms.gov/Newsroom/MediaReleaseDatabase/Press-Releases/2013-Press-Releases-Items/2013-07-26.html

Chang, Daniel. “Feds Ban New Home Healthcare Agencies in Miami to Fight Medicare Fraud.” Miami Herald. (July 26, 2013). From: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/07/26/3524612/feds-ban-new-home-healthcare-agencies.html

Beasley, Deena. “U.S. Bans New Home Health, Ambulance Providers in Three Regions.” Miami Herald. (July 26, 2013). From: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/26/us-medicare-moratoria-idUSBRE96P14P20130726

About the Authors: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

The Affordable Care Act Offers the Government New Tools to Fight Healthcare Fraud

By Catherine T. Hollis, J.D., The Health Law Firm

In 2013, the government reported recovery of a record-breaking $10.7 billion in healthcare fraud in the past three years, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). The HHS credits the Affordable Care Act’s tough stance on fraud for improving the efforts to fight Medicare fraud.

The increase in fraud recovery is attributed in part to the Act’s proactive approach to preventing fraud. The Act contains several initiatives that address Medicare fraud, resulting in increased fraud-fighting tools available to the government. The joint effort between the HHS, the DOJ and the Health Care Fraud Prevention and Enforcement Action Team has been a primary driving force in seeking out fraud and securing recoveries. The HHS and DOJ’s website highlights some of the Act’s “powerful steps” toward fighting fraud, waste and abuse. Click here to read more from www.stopmedicarefraud.gov.

Tougher Punishment.

The Act increases federal sentencing guidelines for healthcare fraud by twenty percent (20%) to fifty percent (50%) for crimes that involve more than $1 million in losses. The Act also establishes penalties for obstructing a fraud investigation or an audit.

Stricter Screening for Enrollment and Revalidation.

According to the HHS, the new screening procedures include licensure checks and site visits for all providers and suppliers. In addition, the Act imposes higher scrutiny on providers and suppliers who may pose a higher risk of fraud or abuse. High risk providers and suppliers can be subject to unscheduled site visits and fingerprint-based criminal background checks.

The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has started to revalidate the enrollment of all 1.5 million existing Medicare providers and suppliers, using the new screening requirements set forth by the Act. Thousands of enrollments have already been deactivated or revoked as the result of this effort. There is a blog on our website about the devastating and far reaching effects of being excluded from the Medicare program. Click here to read that blog.

New Detection Technology.

CMS is using the Fraud Prevention System to screen all fee-for-service Medicare claims. This system uses advanced predictive technology, similar to that used by credit card companies, to analyze claims prior to payment. It also scans for suspicious billing patterns. Claims identified by the Fraud Prevention System as suspect are reviewed by CMS for possible fraud.

Increased Resources.

The Act provides an additional $350 million over ten years (2011 through 2020) through the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Account.

These steps represent a more proactive approach to Medicare fraud. The government is focusing on preventing fraud before it happens, rather than paying fraudulent claims and seeking reimbursement after the fact. The tools contained in the Act, as implemented by CMS and HHS, further the goal of the Act to reduce fraud, waste and abuse in the Medicare system. To read a summary of the anti-fraud provisions in the Affordable Care Act, click here.

Anti-Fraud Provisions At Work.

On May 14, 2013, the HHS and DOJ announced the arrest of 89 people, including doctors, nurses and other medical professionals, in eight cities. These people are allegedly charged in separate Medicare fraud schemes. According to the DOJ, the scans involve approximately $223 million in false billing. Click here to read a blog on these arrests. To read more blogs on Medicare and Medicaid fraud, visit our website.

Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late; Consult with a Health Law Attorney Experienced in Medicare and Medicaid Issues Now.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm represent healthcare providers in Medicare audits, ZPIC audits and RAC audits throughout Florida and across the U.S. They also represent physicians, medical groups, nursing homes, home health agencies, pharmacies, hospitals and other healthcare providers and institutions in Medicare and Medicaid investigations, audits, recovery actions and termination from the Medicare or Medicaid Program.

For more information please visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com or call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001.

Comments?

Do you think the Affordable Care Act will help cut down on healthcare fraud? Why or why not? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Sjoerdsma, Donald. “The Affordable Care Act Bolstered, Didn’t Drive Medicare Anti-Fraud Efforts.” The Medicare Newsgroup. (March 22, 2013). From: http://medicarenewsgroup.com/context/understanding-medicare-blog/understanding-medicare-blog/2013/03/22/the-affordable-care-act-bolstered-didn-t-drive-medicare-anti-fraud-efforts

“The Affordable Care Act and Fighting Fraud.” U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and U.S. Department of Justice. From: http://www.stopmedicarefraud.gov/aboutfraud/aca-fraud/index.html

 

Health Benefits ABCs. “Summary of Anti-Fraud Provisions in the Affordable Care Act.” U.S. Administration on Aging, Department of Health and Human Services. From: http://www.smpresource.org/Content/NavigationMenu/ConsumerProtection/HealthCareReform/Anti-Fraud_Provisions_in_Health_Care_Reform.docx

“New Tools to Fight Fraud, Strengthen Federal and Private Health Programs, and Protect Consumer and Taxpayer Dollars.” U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. (March 15, 2011). From: http://www.healthcare.gov/news/factsheets/2011/03/fraud03152011a.html

About the Author: Catherine T. Hollis is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Former Daytona Beach Chiropractor Will Spend More Than 15 Years Behind Bars

8 Indest-2008-5By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A former Daytona Beach chiropractor will spend more than 15 years in federal prison for an alleged health care fraud scheme and illegally prescribing pills, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Jacksonville Division. He was also ordered to pay more than $2 million in restitution to his victims. The former chiropractor was sentenced on November 29, 2012, by a United States District Judge who called his fraud scheme “sophisticated.”

Click here to read the press release from the FBI.

I previously wrote about this scheme in August 2012, when the former chiropractor was found guilty. To read that blog, click here.

Complex Scheme Involved a Number of Co-Conspirators.

According to the Daytona Beach News Journal, the former chiropractor is thought to have worked with five other doctors in a scheme. The group allegedly split the money they collected from sending inflated bills to insurance companies, including Medicare.

Former Chiropractor Allegedly Prescribed Controlled Substances to Patients.

FBI investigators also accused the former chiropractor of writing prescriptions for controlled substances. Since the man could not prescribe controlled substances, he would use the names of medical doctors who most likely knew their names were being used illegally. It’s believed that there were about a dozen patients who overdosed on controlled substances prescribed by the former chiropractor, according to the Daytona Beach News Journal.

Click here to read the entire Daytona Beach News Journal article.

Effects of Voluntarily Relinquishing a Professional License.

Back in December of 2011, the former chiropractor voluntarily relinquished his license. We almost always counsel our clients to refrain from voluntarily relinquishing their licenses. A voluntary relinquishment of a license in the face of a pending investigation is treated, for all practical purposes, the same as a disciplinary revocation.

The consequences will usually include:

1. Mandatory report to the National Practitioner Data Base (NPDB) (Note:  Healthcare Integrity and Protection Data Bank or HIPDB recently folded into NPDB) which remains there for 50 years.

2. Any other states or jurisdictions in which the client has a license will also initiate action against him or her in that jurisdiction.  (Note:  I have had two clients who had licenses in seven other states).

3. Action to revoke, suspend or take other action against the clinical privileges and medical staff membership of those licensed health professionals who may have such in a hospital, ambulatory surgical center, skilled nursing facility, or staff model HMO or clinic.

4. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) will take action to exclude the provider from the Medicare Program.  If this occurs (and most of these offenses require mandatory exclusion) the provider will be placed on the List of Excluded Individuals and Entities (LEIE) maintained by the HHS OIG.

5. If the above occurs, the provider is also automatically “debarred” or prohibited from participating in any capacity in any federal contracting and is placed on the U.S. General Services Administration’s (GSA’s) debarment list.

6. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will act to revoke the

 professional’s DEA registration if he or she has one.

7. The board certified health professional’s certifying organization will act to revoke his or her certification.

For more reasons why a health care provider should not relinquish a professional license, click here.

Innocent Until Proven Guilty.

Remember, all person are presumed innocent until convicted in a court of law. In this case, the chiropractor has been convicted in a court of law.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Handling Medicare Audits.
Medicare fraud is a serious crime and is vigorously investigated by the FBI, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Often other state and federal agencies, including the U.S. Postal Service (USPS), state Medicaid Fraud Control Units (MFCUs) and other law enforcement agencies participate. Don’t wait until it’s too late. If you are concerned of any possible violations and would like a confidential consultation, contact a qualified health attorney familiar with medical billing and audits today.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys routinely represent physicians, nurses, chiropractors, medical groups, clinics, pharmacies, home health care agencies, nursing homes, group homes and other healthcare providers in Medicaid and Medicare investigations, audits and recovery actions.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Do you think this sentence is too steep? Do you think the doctors the former chiropractor worked with will receive the same sentence? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Pavuk, Amy. “Chiropractor gets 15 Years Prison for Illegally Writing Prescriptions and Healthcare Fraud.” Orlando Sentinel. (November 28, 2012). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/breakingnews/os-chiropractor-painkillers-sentence-20121128,0,60766.story

Federal Bureau of Investigation. “Former Daytona Beach Chiropractor Sentenced to More Than 15 Years in Federal Prison.” FBI. (November 29, 2012). From: http://www.fbi.gov/jacksonville/press-releases/2012/former-daytona-beach-clinic-owner-sentenced-to-more-than-15-years-in-federal-prison

Longa, Lyda. “Judge Sentences Chiropractor Joseph Wagner to 15-Year Term.” Daytona Beach News Journal. (November 28, 2012). From: http://www.news-journalonline.com/article/20121128/NEWS/311289998/1025?p=2&tc=pg

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Hospital to Pay $3.59 Million to Settle False Claims Act Allegations Involving Ambulance Services

By Miles Indest

A hospital located in Columbia, Tennesse, has agreed to pay the federal government over $3.5 million to settle False Claims Act allegations that occurred between 2004 and 2009. The hospital submitted a voluntary self-disclosure to the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Office of Inspector General (OIG).

Hospital Voluntarily Self-Reported After Compliance Program Revealed Billing Errors.

The hospital self-reported after its own compliance program revealed billing problems for ambulance services. The hopsital’s audit of billings reported faulty claims and payment for:

  • Ambulance services that were billed with incorrect mileage units;
  • Ambulance services that were not medically necessary or for which medical necessity was not documented;
  • Ambulance services for which a physician certification statement (PCS) was not obtained;
  • Ambulance services for which the requisite signatures were not obtained; and
  • Ambulance services that were assigned an incorrect transport level.

Hospital Works With U.S. Attorney’s Office to Resolve Billing Errors.

After notifying the U.S. Attorney’s Office that billing issues had been discovered, Maury Regional outlined a plan to determine the scope of these issues. The hospital then worked with the U.S. Attorney’s Office to bring the matter to resolution.

Ambulance Services Flagged for Medicare Audits.

In a Medicare audit of a hospital or ambulance company, ambulance services are frequently chosen for review. Ambulance services companies have increasingly become a target for Medicare audits and are often accused of billing Medicare for unnecessary services. Ambulance companies should have a compliance plan in place to assist in detecting any errors. Ambulance companies should also take all measures to prepare for a Medicare audit, before notice of an audit is received. To learn more about preparing for Medicare audits, click here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Medicare Audits and False Act Claims Cases.

The Health Law Firm represents ambulance companies, emergency transport services, physicians, medical practices, pharmacists, pharmacies, home health agencies, nursing facilities, hospitals, and other health provider in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving government health programs (Medicare, Medicaid, TRICARE). The Health Law Firm also represents health providers in False Claims Act cases.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources Include:

Humbles, Andy. “Maury Regional to Pay $3.5 Million to Settle False Claims Act Allegations.” Tennessean. (June 29, 2012). From: http://www.tennessean.com/article/20120629/NEWS21/306290078/Maury-Regional-pay-3-5-million-settle-False-Claims-Act-allegations

Staff. “Maury Regional Hospital to Pay $3.59 Million to Settle False Claims Act Allegations.” The Daily Herald. (June 29, 2012). From: http://www.columbiadailyherald.com/sections/news/local/maury-regional-hospital-pay-359-million-settle-false-claims-act-allegations.html

Settlement Reached in GlaxoSmithKline Healthcare Fraud Case

By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), a prescription drug manufacturer, will pay $3 billion in fines to resolve allegations of healthcare fraud. The settlement was announced by federal prosecutors on July 1, 2012, and in a press release from the Florida Attorney General on July 2, 2012. This is the largest healthcare fraud settlement in U.S. history.

Settlement Resolves Allegations Against GSK Related to Healthcare Fraud.

The settlement resolves allegations that GSK:

  • Marketed the depression drug Paxil for off-label uses, such as use by children and adolescents; 
  • Marketed the depression drug Wellbutrin for off-label uses, such as for weight loss and treatment of sexual dysfunction, and at higher-than-approved dosages; 
  • Marketed the asthma drug Advair for off-label uses, including first-line use for asthma;
  • Marketed the seizure medication Lamictal for off-label uses, including bipolar depression, neuropathic pain, and various other psychiatric conditions; 
  • Marketed the nausea drug Zofran for off-label uses, including pregnancy-related nausea; 
  • Made false representations regarding the safety and efficacy of Paxil, Wellbutrin, Advair, Lamictal, Zofran, and the diabetes drug Avandia;
  • Offered kickbacks to healthcare professionals to induce them to promote and prescribe certain prescription drugs; and
  • Submitted incorrect pricing data for various prescription drugs, thereby underpaying rebates owed to Medicaid and other federal healthcare programs.

GSK Will Also Plead Guilty to Criminal Charges as Part of Settlement.

As part of the settlement, GSK has will plead guilty to criminal charges that it violated the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA). Allegedly, GSK introduced Wellbutrin and Paxil into interstate commerce when the drugs contained labels that were not in accordance with their FDA approvals. Additionally, GSK allegedly failed to report certain clinical data regarding Avandia to the FDA.

Florida to Receive Over $56 Million In Settlement.

Florida will receive more than $56 million as part of the settlement with GSK. Florida Attorney General, Pam Bondi, announced the state’s participation in the settlement on July 2, 2012.

Settlement Stems From Whistleblower Actions.

The settlement is based on four qui tam, or whistleblower, actions brought by individuals pursuant to state and federal false claims. To view the federal False Claims Act, click here. A National Association of Medicaid Fraud Control Units team, along with several other federal agencies, investigated the matter and conducted settlement negotiations with the defendants. Florida’s civil investigation was handled by the Attorney General’s Complex Civil Enforcement Bureau, which is part of the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Healthcare Fraud Cases.

The Health Law Firm represents physicians, medical practices, pharmacists, pharmacies, and other health providers in healthcare fraud cases, including investigations, regulatory matters, litigation, and audits involving government health programs (Medicare, Medicaid, TRICARE).

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources Include:

Meale, Jenn. “Attorney General Bondi’s Office Reaches Historic Healthcare Fraud Settlement.” Florida Office of the Attorney General. (July 2, 2012). Press Release. From: http://www.myfloridalegal.com/newsrel.nsf/newsreleases/E494FDADFF113AC885257A2F0068F790

Schmidt, Michael S. and Katie Thomas. “GlaxoSmithKline Agrees to Pay $3 Billion in Fraud Settlement.” New York Times. (July 2, 2012). From: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/03/business/glaxosmithkline-agrees-to-pay-3-billion-in-fraud-settlement.html?pagewanted=all

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.