Tag Archives: Department of Health (DOH)

Oncologist Accused of Billing Medicare for Unnecessary Chemotherapy-Employee Whistleblowers Filed First Claim

4 Indest-2009-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A Michigan oncologist is accused of deliberately misdiagnosing patients with cancer so he could allegedly administer chemotherapy treatments and bill the government for those treatments, according to the Department of Justice (DOJ). For more than two years the oncologist allegedly billed Medicare for $35 million in fraudulent claims. The oncologist was charged on August 19, 2013, with one count of Medicare fraud, according to the DOJ.

On top of submitting false claims to Medicare, a criminal complaint alleges a number of other serious charges. These include hiring doctors who may not have been properly licensed to practice medicine, administering controlled substances to patients at dangerous levels, and delaying hospital care for a patient with serious injuries, among others.

The complaint is allegedly based on interviews with several nurse practitioners, medical assistants and another doctor who worked for the oncologist at Michigan Hematology Oncology Centers (MHO), according to the DOJ. These whistleblowers allegedly approached federal authorities with this information.

Click here to read the press release from the DOJ.

We are aware of similar stories regarding dermatologists misdiagnosing lesions as cancer. Some of these have been widely publicized in media reports, television news and magazine stories, such as “American Greed.”

Whistleblowers Come Forward with Serious Charges Against Oncologist.

The oncologist’s employees allege the doctor submitted fraudulent claims to Medicare for medically unnecessary services, including chemotherapy treatments, Positron Emission Tomograph (PET) scans, and a variety of cancer and hematology treatments for patients who did not need them. According to an article in Time, the complaint also alleges the oncologist administered unnecessary chemotherapy to patients in remission, deliberately misdiagnosed patients as having cancer to justify unnecessary cancer treatment, and administered chemotherapy to end-of-life patients who would not have benefitted from the treatment.

The criminal complaint also alleges, according to Time, that the oncologist distributed controlled substances to patients without medical necessity and employed foreign doctors who might have been unlicensed to practice medicine in the U.S.

According to Time, the complaint also cited one case in which the oncologist’s patient fell and hit his head at the oncologist’s office, and was told he needed chemotherapy before he could be taken to the hospital. The patient allegedly later died from the head injury.

Click here to read the entire Time article.

Oncologist Faces Prison Time and Fine.

According to Detroit News, the oncologist could face up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 criminal fine if convicted. The oncologist has entered a not guilty plea in this case. At this point, these accusations are just that, allegations. A check of the oncologist’s license status from the Michigan Department of Health (DOH) shows that his license is active.

To read the Detroit News article, click here.

Most Qui Tams Filed by Doctors, Nurses and Employees.

From our review of qui tam cases that have been unsealed by the government, it appears most of these are filed by physicians, nurses or hospital staff employees who have some knowledge of false billing or inappropriate coding taking place. Normally the government will want to see some actual documentation of the claims submitted by the hospital or other institution. Usually physicians, nurses or staff employees have access to such documentation.

To learn more on whistleblower cases, read our two-part blog. Click here for part one, and click here for part two.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Qui Tam or Whistleblower Cases.

Attorneys with The Health Law Firm also represent health care professionals and health facilities in qui tam or whistleblower cases both in defending such claims and in bringing such claims. We have developed relationships with recognized experts in health care accounting, health care financing, utilization review, medical review, filling, coding, and other services that assist us in such matters. We have represented doctors, nurses and others as relators in bringing qui tam or whistleblower cases, as well.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Individuals working in the health care industry often become aware of questionable activities. Often they are even asked to participate in it. In many cases the activity may amount to fraud on the government. Has this ever happened to you? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Department of Justice. “Oakland County Doctor and Owner of Michigan Hemotology and Oncology Centers Charged in $35 Million Medicare Fraud Scheme.” Department of Justice. (August 6, 2013). From: http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2013/August/13-crm-885.html

Pickert, Kate. “Medicare Fraud Horror: Cancer Doctor Indicted for Billing Unnecessary Chemo.” Time U.S. (August 15, 2013). From: http://nation.time.com/2013/08/15/medicare-fraud-horror-cancer-doctor-indicted-for-billing-unnecessary-chemo/

Hunter, George. “Michigan Cancer Doctor Formally Charged in Medicare Fraud Scheme.” Detroit News. (August 19, 2013). From: http://bit.ly/14T8A2A

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Relocating, Selling or Closing Your Medical Practice? Be Sure to Comply with Florida Law

00011_RT8By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Relocating, selling or retiring is never an easy decision for a physician. On top of patients’ anxiety about their doctor leaving, there are also legal hoops you will be required to jump through. It’s important to know what is expected of you as you relocate, sell or retire from a practice. The last thing any doctor on his or her way out would want is a letter from the Florida Department of Health (DOH) informing him or her that when the practice closed he or she failed to follow the proper procedures under Florida law. Even in retirement, the Florida DOH can fine a physician or health care provider. And believe me that does happen.

This blog is intended to help any physician or health care provider relocating, retiring or terminating a practice. It will explain the necessary steps that need to be taken under Rule 64B8-10.002, Florida Administrative Code.

Notifying Patients of Relocation or Termination of a Practice.

When a licensed physician terminates practice or relocates and is no longer available to patients, patients should be notified of such termination, sale or relocation. The physician is required to publically announce the event by publishing an announcement once during each week for four consecutive weeks in the newspaper of the greatest general circulation in each county in which the physician practices. So for example, if you live in the Orlando, Florida, area, you would want to publish the notice in the Orlando Sentinel. The newspaper notification must announce the date of termination, sale or relocation and an address where patients can obtain a copy of their medical records.

A copy of the notice must be mailed to the Florida Board of Medicine within a month of the date of relocation or termination of the medical practice. It would be in your best interest to obtain and keep a copy of your notice from the newspaper, just in case the board audits you or someone files a complaint.

Signs at the Office are Optional.

The physician may, but is not required to, place a sign at a location in the office to notify patients by letter of the termination, sale or relocation of the practice. The sign or notice will advise patients of their opportunity to transfer or receive their records. Again, this is optional.

Keeping Medical Records.

Under Section 458.331(1)(m), Florida Statutes, a physician must keep adequate written medical records for a period of five years from the last patient contact, so medical record storage options, which must properly conform with state and federal privacy regulations, will have to be considered. Alternatively, the sale of a practice necessitates an execution of the proper medical record transfer agreement as part of the transaction.

Also keep in mind, a physician planning to close, sell or relocate a medical practice must consider how to effectively notify employees about termination and must properly maintain employee records and other medical billing records after the practice has closed its doors.

Notifying All Appropriate Groups.

On top of informing the Florida Board of Medicine, physicians may also be required to notify other licensing authorities. This may include the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Florida DOH, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), and other local business licensing authorities.

These rules can be confusing and complex. To ensure you have completely complied with Florida law, consult with a health law attorney experienced in these matters.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Business Transactions and Contracts.

At the Health Law Firm we provide legal services for all health care providers and professionals. This includes physicians, nurses, dentists, psychologists, psychiatrists, mental health counselors, Durable Medical Equipment suppliers, medical students and interns, hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, pain management clinics, nursing homes, and any other health care provider. We represent facilities, individuals, groups and institutions in contracts, sales, mergers and acquisitions.

The services we provide include reviewing and negotiating contracts, business transactions, professional license defense, representation in investigations, credential defense, representation in peer review and clinical privileges hearings, Medicare and Medicaid audits, commercial litigation, and administrative hearings.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Have you gone through the process of selling, relocating or retiring? How did you comply with all the rules? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Source:

Rule 64B8-10.002, F.A.C., Medical Records of Physicians Relocating or Terminating Practice; Retention, Disposition, Time Limitations.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Enforcing Your Right to Access Public Records

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm

Citizens of the state of Florida enjoy broad access to the public records created by state agencies.  Those records range from information on state contracts to certain police records to information on state licensees. Almost all records created by or held by state agencies on you are considered public records with certain limited exceptions.

Access to public records is guaranteed by both Article I, Section 24, of the Florida Constitution and Chapter 119, Florida Statutes.  Those laws state that every person has the right to access any public record made or received in connection with the official business of any public body, officer or employee of the state of Florida, subject to certain specific exceptions.

What to do if Your Records Request is Refused.

Public records requests can be refused for many reasons.  The most common reason is a statutory exemption or destruction of the records due to retention policies.

If you have requested records that the custodial agency is refusing on exemption grounds, you have a right to know exactly what Florida Administrative Code Rule or Statute the agency is relying on.  You can then challenge the exemption if you believe the agency is not entitled to rely on it.

If you have requested records that the custodial agency has stated were destroyed, you have a right to a copy of the proof of destruction documentation.  Rule 1B-24.003(9)(d), Florida Administrative Code, and Florida General Records Schedule GS1-SL provide for records retention schedules and the right to the information pertaining to the disposition of records.

Many agency records are kept in both hard copy and electronic format.  It is crucial to check that the disposition of records form states how both types of information were disposed of.

It is the experience of this firm that many times the hard copies of the records are destroyed by the agency, but the electronic copies are maintained in its systems.  This can lead to an undisclosed “shadow file” being maintained.  This is especially dangerous with records such as Department of Health (DOH) disciplinary files.

In the case of the DOH, it maintains electronic records of discipline that it freely provides to other agencies (even those outside of the state).  However, when a licensee requests copies of his or her records, the DOH tells him or her that they have been destroyed.  While the paper records may have been destroyed, the electronic ones are freely accessible and disclosable.

If you believe that a state agency has electronic records you have a right to view, speak with an attorney to facilitate a supervised inspection of the records system.  This is your right under Chapter 119, Florida Statutes, and the Florida Constitution.

Enforcing Your Right to Inspect and Copy Public Records.

If the agency from which you are requesting records refuses to provide them to you or otherwise permit you to inspect or photograph them in person, you have the right to seek enforcement in court.

In order to do this, you will be required to file a Petition for Writ of Mandamus in the appropriate circuit court.  This petition is used to force a public officer to perform the duties of his or her office. Because public officers and officials are required by law to permit the inspection, copying and photographing of all non-exempt public records, a court can force them to comply with your request by issuing a Writ of Mandamus.

Public Records Actions and Attorney’s Fees and Costs.

Many people are willing to accept an agency’s refusal to provide access to public records because they are afraid of the attorney’s fees and costs associated with enforcing their rights.  However, the law in Florida strongly favors the public’s access to information and contains a robust attorney’s fees provision.

Section 119.12, Florida Statutes, provides that a person who is forced to bring a civil action (lawsuit) to enforce his or her right to public records is entitled to receive payment of his or her reasonable attorney’s fees and costs incurred in bringing the action from the agency.

Courts have further interpreted the public records laws to provide for an award of attorney’s fees even when the agency produces the records after suit but before being ordered to do so by a court.  This means that you can still recover your attorney’s fees and costs even if the agency produces the records before the court forces it to do so.

Protect Your Personal and Professional Reputation.

There is a wide range of potentially damaging information maintained by state agencies.  The first step in preventing any harm to your personal and professional reputation is to know what information is out there, in what forms, and know the possibilities of it being disseminated in harmful ways.

Navigating the many exemption and enforcement provisions of Florida’s public records laws can be daunting.  It is important to consult with an attorney experienced in handling these matters.  It is also important to remember that if you are unlawfully being denied access to public records, there is a strong chance that your enforcement costs will be awarded by a reviewing court.

Contact Attorneys Experienced in Enforcing Access to Public Records.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm are experienced in representing citizens attempting to determine if a governmental agency has certain records it is keeping on them and obtaining copies or an inspection of such records. We have been successful in suing and obtaining access to “secret” records being kept by the Department of Health (DOH) on health professionals after their existence was denied by the agency for years.  In such cases, the citizen who is required to sue the agency is entitled to payment of his or her attorney’s fees and costs by the agency.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Have you ever had issues trying to access your public records? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Number of Oxycodone-Related Deaths Down in Florida

1 Indest-2008-1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

It looks like Florida’s prescription drug legislation, the statewide prescription drug monitoring database and the prescription drug crackdowns by law enforcement may be working, according to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE). The FDLE states in its semi-annual report, oxycodone-related deaths statewide dropped between January and June of 2012, compared to the same period of time in 2011. A look at the national numbers shows that the number of people abusing prescription drugs is also down.

Florida and National Numbers.

In the first half of 2012, there were 759 oxycodone-related deaths in Florida, according to the Orlando Sentinel. That number is down from 1,058 during the same time period a year before. The Orlando Sentinel states that nationwide 7 million people abused prescription drugs in 2010. By 2011, that number had dropped to 6.1 million. Studies also show prescription drug use among young adults ages 18 to 25 is also on the decline. The Metropolitan Bureau of Investigation Director believes these numbers are down because young people are realizing these drugs are dangerous and can be deadly.

Click here to read the entire article from the Orlando Sentinel.

Florida Cracks Down on Prescription Drug Abuse.

Previously, Florida was known as a state where drug addicts and dealers could easily find a pill mill or go doctor shopping to get prescription drugs. In the past two years, Florida state leaders and law enforcement officials have stepped up regulations and made serious crackdowns on doctors, pharmacists and pharmacies.

In April 2013, a Lake Mary doctor was sentenced to 25 years in prison for trafficking prescription drugs. Click here to read that story. In December 2012, a fake prescription drug ring was busted in Osceola County. To read that story, click here. In June 2012, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and Florida law enforcement announced operation “Pill Street Blues” targeting doctors and clinic owners across Florida. Click here to read more.

Health Care Professional Must Stay Ahead of Patients with Chronic Pain.

Even though the number of people abusing prescription drugs is down, state regulatory boards, private certification boards and federal agencies are not going to ease up. Many physicians in practice today are eschewing multi-disciplinary approaches to treating chronic pain in favor of monotherapies with narcotic medications.

These physicians do this at their own peril. In our practice we see many physicians in trouble with state medical boards and law enforcement officials because of their prescribing practices. If you treat patients with chronic pain it is imperative that you stay ahead of them. Click here to read a blog on legal tips for health care professionals to manage pain patients.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, pain management doctors, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Do you think the new legislation, the state prescription drug monitoring database and the crackdowns by law enforcement are making a difference in the war against prescription drugs? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Pavuk, Amy. “‘We Can Stop This Epidemic,’ CDC Boss Says at Rx-Drug Abuse Summit in Orlando.” Orlando Sentinel. (April 2, 2013). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/breakingnews/os-prescription-drug-abuse-summit-20130402,0,4693169.story

Pavuk, Amy. “Drug-Related Deaths Plunge in First Half of 2012.” Orlando Sentinel. (March 25, 2013). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/breakingnews/os-drug-deaths-down-20130325,0,6750345.story

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Two More Compounding Pharmacies Recall Drugs

CCS Blog LabelBy Carole C. Schriefer, R.N., J.D., The Health Law Firm and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Two different compounding pharmacies have recently recalled products due to concerns from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The New Jersey compounding pharmacy, Med Prep Consulting, and Clinical Specialties Compounding in Georgia, both recalled products between March 17, 2013 and March 20, 2013.

The recalls were issued as the FDA and state agencies step up regulation on compounding pharmacies across the country. These agencies are trying to prevent another widespread outbreak, like the fungal meningitis outbreak in the fall of 2012, which is responsible for 50 deaths.

Recall Upgraded in New Jersey.

Med Prep Consulting first issued a recall on March 17, 2013, for all lots of magnesium sulfate for injections after a hospital reported seeing visible particles in the containers. Three days later, the compounding pharmacy recalled all of its compounded products. Med Prep Consulting has halted production, processing and shipping. The FDA reported products distributed through March 15, 2013, in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Connecticut need to be returned to the company. Click here to see all the recalled products from Med Prep Consulting.

Eye Infections from Georgia Compounding Pharmacy Products.

According to Modern Healthcare, at least five people have acquired serious eye infections associated with the use of the cancer drug Avastin packaged in syringes from Clinical Specialties Compounding. At the company’s facility in Georgia the FDA raised concerns about the lack of sterility assurance. Products covered under the recall were distributed nationwide, between October 19, 2012 and March 19, 2013. Until further notice, healthcare providers are asked to stop using all of these sterile products and return them to the company. Click here to read the press release on the recall from the FDA.

Florida Compounding Pharmacy in Hot Water Due to Fungal Growth.
We have previously blogged about the problems encountered by Franck’s pharmacy in Ocala, Florida. It has been accused of distributing eye medications that contained a fungal infection. Click here for the first blog and here for the second blog on this.

Harsher Regulations on Compounding Pharmacies.

Since the widespread fungal meningitis outbreak, compounding pharmacies have fallen under heightened scrutiny. The FDA is beefing up their oversight of compounding, and, according to Modern Healthcare, the FDA and state Department of Health (DOH) agencies have been paying surprise visits to compounding pharmacies. Click here to read more from Modern Healthcare.

Common Deficiencies We See in Pharmacy Inspections.

Pharmacies and pharmacists are subject to many types of inspections. These inspections are necessary to determine whether the business and its employees are complying with state and federal laws and regulations. Administrative agencies, such as the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), FDA and DOH, have the authority to inspect pharmacies.

With our experience working with pharmacists and pharmacies we’ve seen a number of different inspection deficiencies. These errors may result in a complaint being filed and the beginning of the administrative law process regarding investigations and hearings.

Here are some common deficiencies often found during pharmacy inspections:

1. Pharmacy technicians not properly identified with name tags and identified as
pharmacy technicians (as opposed to pharmacists);

2. Pharmacy technicians not supervised by pharmacist;

3. Medication on shelves not properly labeled (including exact number of pills remaining in bottle);

4. Controlled substances not accurately recorded on appropriate forms; and

5. Not keeping schedule II inventory and dispensing records separate from schedule III-V records.

Click here to read a recently blog listing more deficiencies and your best defense to protect your pharmacy license and pharmacist license.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think of the harsher regulations compound pharmacies are now facing? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Meinhardt, Jane. “Compounding Pharmacies Set to Navigate Potential Regulations.” Tampa Bay Business Journal. (January 25, 2013). From: http://www.bizjournals.com/tampabay/print-edition/2013/01/25/compounding-pharmacies-set-to-navigate.html?s=print

Blesch, Gregg. “Georgia Compounding Pharmacy Widens Recall.” Modern Healthcare. (March 22, 2013). From: http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20130322/NEWS/303229959/#

Clinical Specialties. “Clinical Specialties Compounding Pharmacy Announces Voluntary Nationwide Recall of All lots of Sterile Products Repackaged and Distributed by Clinical Specialties Compounding Due to Lack of Sterility Assurance.” Food and Drug Administration. (March 20, 2013). From: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm344786.htm

About the Authors: Carole C. Schriefer is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Phony Florida Physician Uses Silicone and Krazy Glue – Arrested Twice for Practicing Medicine Without a License

6 Indest-2008-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A South Florida man was arrested on February 6, 2013, for allegedly injecting people with silicone in a West Palm Beach motel room. He has been charged with practicing medicine without a license. According to the Sun Sentinel, this was the man’s second arrest within two months for the same crime.

Click here to read the entire article from the Sun Sentinel.

This “Krazy” Tale.

Police say this fake physician injected his customers with buttocks-enhancing silicone injections. He would then allegedly seal up the skin wounds with Krazy Glue. Victims sayhe would not wear gloves or protective clothing during the procedures. Each victim was charged $200 for each visit. This phony health professional was also arrested in January 2013, when two victims told investigators similar stories about his illegal injections.

In each case, the side effects in patients included severe infections, and the damage is thought to be permanent.

South Florida and Phony Health Professionals.

This is by no means the first report we’ve heard of phony health professionals in South Florida injecting people with toxic chemicals. Back in 2012, a number of people became sick and deformed after a Broward County, Florida, woman allegedly injected victims’ buttocks, hips and breasts with a combination of Fix-A-Flat tire sealant, cement, mineral oil and Super Glue. One of the victims died as a result of the procedure, according to the Daily Mail Reporter. The victims claimed the woman administering the injections presented herself as a medical professional and wore a nurse’s uniform.

To read more on this story from the Daily Mail Reporter, click here.

Practicing Without a License Is a Crime.


Practicing medicine without a license is a crime. Additionally, so is helping someone practice medicine without a license. As a practitioner, you may be asked to supervise or join a practice. Remember that your license may be at stake with any wrongdoing by your subordinates. Before you join a practice or agree to supervise others, check first with the Department of Health (DOH) that the other providers are legitimate. You can verify a license for free on the DOH’s website.

Also, remember that a license to practice medicine in Venezuela, Cuba, or anywhere else, is just that: a license to practice in that country. It does not allow a person to practice medicine in the United States. A specific license from the State of Florida is required to practice in Florida, except for certain military and federal physicians. Always check the physician’s license.

More Stories on Fake Physicians and Other Phony and Fraudulent Professionals to Come.


In the near future on this blog we will include additional articles on fake doctors and health professionals, some old, some new.

To see a blog on a fake dentist in Miami, click here. You can also read the story of a fake plastic surgeon in New York by clicking here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.


The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.


Comments?

What do you think of all of these news stories of phony health care professionals? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Komedna, Ed. “‘Motel Surgeon’ Arrested Again for Silicone Injections, Deputies Say.” Sun Sentinel. (February 6, 2013). From: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/palm-beach/fl-butler-surgery-arrest-20130206,0,2237567.story

United Press International Inc. “Man Arrested Again for Buttocks Injections.” United Press International Inc. (February 6, 2013). From: http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2013/02/07/Arrest-for-illegal-silicone-injections/UPI-97251360271074/?spt=hs&or=tn

Daily Mail Reporter. “Toxic tush transgender nurse charged with manslaughter after patient DIES following ‘injection with rubber cement and tire sealant in backroom cosmetic surgery’.” (July 26, 2012). From: www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2179631/Toxic-tush-nurse-Oneal-Morris-charged-manslaughter-patient-DIES.html#axzz2KKi2pPmh

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Hydrocodone Combination Drugs Could Be Reclassified to Schedule II Category of Controlled Substances

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm, and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee voted 19 to 10 in favor of moving hydrocodone combination drugs from schedule III into the more restrictive schedule II category of controlled substances. According to a number of different sources, on January 25, 2013, the committee presented this recommendation to the FDA. If approved, hydrocodone combination drugs, such as Vicodin, will be harder for physicians to prescribe.

The advisory committee met because the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is requesting the FDA to approve the reclassification of hydrocodone combination products. The DEA wants to help curb the growing number of people across the country addicted to painkillers.

Click here to read an FDA briefing document given to the advisory committee.

It is now up to the FDA to decide whether or not to implement the advisory committee’s decision as to whether hydrocodone combination drugs will stay labeled as schedule III controlled substances or move to schedule II controlled substances. If medications containing hydrocodone are moved to schedule II, they will be in the same category as the widely abused oxycodone.

Hydrocodone Abuse is Serious.

Currently, hydrocodone products are the most widely prescribed drugs in the U.S., according to an article on MedPage Today. Records show that painkiller abuse kills more people in America than heroin and cocaine combined. The DEA argues that since these drugs are so frequently abused, they should be more tightly controlled.

To read the MedPage Today article, click here.

What You Need to Know as a Health Care Provider.

This change would have wide-spread consequences for health care professionals, especially doctors and pharmacists. Under the schedule II category of controlled substances, physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners would no longer be legally allowed to prescribe hydrocodone combination drugs.

If the recommendation is accepted, it would be more difficult for patients to obtain refills on hydrocodone combination drugs. Refills without a new prescription, faxed prescriptions and prescriptions called in by telephone would all be banned. Only written prescriptions from a doctor would be allowed.

If the recommendation is adopted, much stricter scrutiny on the purchasing, prescribing, retailing and use of these medications can also be expected. Prosecutions and administrative actions can also be expected to follow.

The FDA is also debating the DEA’s request to limit prescriptions of hydrocodone combination pills to a 90-day supply instead of the current regulations which permit five refills within six months.

Arguments Heard Against the Reclassification.

According to an article in The New York Times, many opponents spoke against the recommendation. Advocates for nursing home patients argued that weak and elderly residents with chronic pain would have to make a difficult trip to see a doctor just to get a prescription refilled. Click here to read The New York Times article.

Some committee members questioned if there was another option to consider versus changing the scheduling. They questioned whether greater use of e-prescribing and Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, as well as better education efforts for clinicians and patients would be better solutions for the drug abuse epidemic.

Now it remains to be seen how the FDA will interpret the advisory committee’s recommendation.

Florida’s Prescription Drug Abuse Epidemic.

Florida law enforcement including the DEA, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and Department of Health (DOH) all seem to be having a hard time keeping up with prescription drug abuse in Florida.

We have written a number of blogs on the abuse of narcotics in Florida. See our blog on a fake prescription ring busted in Osceola County, and a Central Florida nurse accused of illegally obtaining prescriptions for painkillers, for example. Check our website for similar blogs.

Pharmacists, pharmacies, legal distributors and physicians are often too caught up in the frenzy to stem prescription drug abuse and to eliminate “pill mills.”

Call Experienced Health Law Attorneys for Your Legal Needs.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.
Sound Off.

As a health care professional, do you think hydrocodone products should be labeled as a schedule II controlled substance? What are the positive and negative effects of this decision? Please leave any thoughtful comment below.
Sources:

Fiore, Kristina. “FDA Panel Votes for Tighter Controls on Vicodin.” MedPage Today. (January 25, 2013). From: http://bit.ly/X8qlsu

Tavernise, Sabrina. “F.D.A. Likely to Add Limits on Painkillers.” The New York Times. (January 25, 2013). From: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/26/health/fda-vote-on-restricting-hydrocodone-products-vicodin.html?_r=0
About the Authors: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.
“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

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