Category Archives: Department of Health

OIG Audit Finds Federal Database of Terminated Medicaid Providers Needs Improvement

LLA Headshot smBy Lenis L. Archer, J.D., M.P.H., The Health Law Firm

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to establish a process for sharing information about terminated Medicaid providers. The federal database, called Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program State Information Sharing System (MCSIS), is designed to prevent terminated health care providers from billing another state’s program. However, an audit by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Inspector General (OIG), released in March 2014, states the MCSIS is not working as intended.

The MCSIS is supposed to collect data from every state Medicaid program on providers that were terminated from Medicaid for cause. However, the report found that the HHS OIG is not receiving data from 17 states or the District of Columbia. It was also found that a majority of the data does not meet the ACA criteria.

To read the entire report from the HHS OIG, click here.

Specific Issues Within Database.

According to the OIG, only 27% of the 6,439 MCSIS records involve terminated Medicaid providers. The database is filled with providers who had not been terminated, but rather had died, retired, left the state or stopped working with Medicaid of their own accord. It is also reported that about one-third of the records are not related to for-cause provider terminations. A majority of the data comes from California, Pennsylvania, Illinois and New York. According to Reuters, more than half of the records submitted did not include a National Provider Identification number, which is critical to any state trying to identify a terminated provider.

Click here to read the entire article from Reuters.

Recommendations to Improve Database.

CMS is now exploring options to implement mandatory state reporting. The agency has begun requiring that states submit termination letters for each provider entered in the MCSIS, and that CMS employees review each letter to ensure the provider belongs in the system.

What This Means for Medicaid Providers.

As CMS works to improve this database, those providers who have fallen through the cracks due to the reporting lag will now face repercussions for exclusion. Exclusion from Medicaid could mean exclusion from Medicare and other federal providers. It is important that health care providers know their status regarding exclusion, and contact an experience attorneys to assist them in having their names removed from exclusion lists.

To read more on the devastating consequences of exclusion, click here for a previous blog.

Contact Attorneys Experienced in Defending Against Action to Exclude an Individual or Business from the Medicare or Medicaid Programs.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm have experience in dealing with the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and defending against action to exclude an individual or business entity from the Medicare or Medicaid  Programs, in administrative hearings on this type of action, in submitting applications requesting reinstatement to the Medicare Program after exclusion, and removal from the List of Excluded Individuals and Entities (LEIE).

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

As a health care provider, do you know your status regarding exclusion? Are you aware of the consequences of being excluded? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Pell, M.B. “U.S Database for Tracking Medicaid Fraud Fall Short, Auditor Says.” Reuters. (March 27, 2014). From: http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/03/27/us-usa-medicaid-database-idUSBREA2Q08D20140327

Levinson, Daniel. “CMS’s Process for Sharing Information About Terminated Providers Needs Improvement.” Department of Health and Human Service Office of Inspector General. (March 2014). From: http://oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-06-12-00031.pdf

About the Author: Lenis L. Archer is as attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Some Providers Billing PIP Claims No Longer Exempt From Health Care Clinic Act

MS_smBy Michael L. Smith, R.R.T., J.D., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Some health care providers that were previously exempt from the requirements of the Health Care Clinic Act are now required to obtain a Health Care Clinic license in order to bill for care provided to their patients injured in car accidents.

The original purpose of the Health Care Clinic Act was to regulate health care entities that were not owned by licensed health care providers. Entities that were owned by licensed health care providers were exempt from the Health Care Clinic license requirements because those health care providers were already regulated by the Department of Health (DOH).

Effective January 1, 2013, the law changed so that every health care provider that bills personal injury protection (PIP) insurance carriers is now required to obtain a Health Care Clinic license unless the provider is exempt from that requirement under the PIP statute. The only health care providers that are still exempt under the PIP statute are medial doctors, osteopathic doctors, chiropractic doctors, and dentists. Physical therapists, nurse practitioners and doctors of podiatry must be licensed as Health Care Clinics in order to bill PIP insurance carriers. Acupuncture doctors and massage therapists are now completely prohibited from billing PIP insurance carriers.

Additional Requirements on Health Care Clinics.

The PIP statute also imposes additional requirements on Health Care Clinics before those clinics can bill PIP insurance carriers. In order to bill PIP, a Health Care Clinic must be:

A health care clinic licensed under Part X of Chapter 400, Florida Statutes, and is accredited by an accrediting organization whose standards incorporate comparable regulations required by this state, or

1. Has a medical director licensed under chapter 458, chapter 459, or chapter 460;
2. Has been continuously licensed for more than three years or is a publicly traded corporation that issues securities traded on an exchange registered with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission as a national securities exchange; and
3. Provides at least four of the following medical specialties:

a. General medicine
b. Radiography
c. Orthopedic medicine
d. Physical medicine
e. Physical therapy
f. Physical rehabilitation
g. Prescribing or dispensing outpatient prescription medication
h. Laboratory services.

Click here to read 627.736(1)(a)2e, Florida Statutes.

PIP Insurance Carriers Might Deny Claims.

The Florida PIP statute also provides that a physical therapist can provide follow-up care upon the referral by a physician, which conflicts with the new Health Care Clinic license requirements in other parts of the statute. Several PIP insurance carriers are denying provider claims and demanding refunds based upon their own interpretations of these changes. A health care provider that receives denials, or demands for refunds should immediately contact an attorney experienced in these matters.

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, denials and demands for repayment from insurance companies, inspections and audits involving the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Were you aware for the changes to the Health Care Clinic Act? Were you previously exempt and now required to obtain a Health Care Clinic license? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: Michael L. Smith, R.R.T., J.D., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Removal of Past Criminal History from Florida Department of Health Practitioner Profile

LOL Blog Label 2By Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm and  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

By statute, the Florida Legislature requires that the Department of Health (DOH) maintain an online practitioner profile for medical doctors, osteopathic physicians (DOs), chiropractors (DCs), advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) and podiatric physicians.

Click here to learn more about these profiles from the DOH’s website.

However, the same law requires those health professionals to immediately update the profile when there is a change and to verify its accuracy.

What Does the Practitioner Profile Contain?

DOH practitioner profiles contain information such as education, disciplinary history, practice address, criminal history, malpractice actions, licensure actions by other jurisdictions, hospital privileging actions, insurance information and other optional information.  These profiles are published on the DOH’s website.  They are freely accessible by the public and are frequently used by employers, medical staff committees, and insurance panels to verify information provided by applicants.

Check Your Personal Profile for Accuracy.

Unfortunately, this information is not always correct.  Oftentimes the information in a profile is outdated or misreported.  The majority of the information in a profile is supposed to be entered through the website by the practitioner personally; however, the DOH is free to add information on its own.

Recently, The Health Law Firm had a client whose employment contract was not renewed due to misreported criminal history information on the DOH practitioner profile.  Most troubling was the fact that this information appeared on the profile suddenly; it had not been on the practitioner profile in the past.  Furthermore, the information was decades old and had been posted in direct violation of a court order sealing the underlying records.

We have also had cases where information was incorrect, where the same information was repeated several times, or where the information on the profile did not meet basic requirements for reporting.

Fight Misreported Information on Your Practitioner Profile.

The Health Law Firm has been successful in having the DOH remove criminal history information and other incorrect information from a practitioner profile.

It is imperative that you check your practitioner profile regularly to ensure that it is accurate with respect to the information that you provided and that may have been provided by the DOH.  If you find that confidential or incorrect information has been posted to your profile, contact an attorney experienced with dealing with these matters immediately.  You never know when your employer, a business associate or potential patient will look up your information on your profile.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Department of Health Investigations.

At the Health Law Firm we provide legal services for all health care providers and professionals. This includes physicians, nurses, dentists, psychologists, psychiatrists, mental health counselors, Durable Medical Equipment (DME) suppliers, medical students and interns, chiropractors, hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, pain management clinics, nursing homes and any other health care provider

Our attorneys provide legal representation in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Do you update and maintain your online practitioner profile? Have you ever noticed any misreported information on your profile? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Authors: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Relocating, Selling or Closing Your Medical Practice? Be Sure to Comply with Florida Law

00011_RT8By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Relocating, selling or retiring is never an easy decision for a physician. On top of patients’ anxiety about their doctor leaving, there are also legal hoops you will be required to jump through. It’s important to know what is expected of you as you relocate, sell or retire from a practice. The last thing any doctor on his or her way out would want is a letter from the Florida Department of Health (DOH) informing him or her that when the practice closed he or she failed to follow the proper procedures under Florida law. Even in retirement, the Florida DOH can fine a physician or health care provider. And believe me that does happen.

This blog is intended to help any physician or health care provider relocating, retiring or terminating a practice. It will explain the necessary steps that need to be taken under Rule 64B8-10.002, Florida Administrative Code.

Notifying Patients of Relocation or Termination of a Practice.

When a licensed physician terminates practice or relocates and is no longer available to patients, patients should be notified of such termination, sale or relocation. The physician is required to publically announce the event by publishing an announcement once during each week for four consecutive weeks in the newspaper of the greatest general circulation in each county in which the physician practices. So for example, if you live in the Orlando, Florida, area, you would want to publish the notice in the Orlando Sentinel. The newspaper notification must announce the date of termination, sale or relocation and an address where patients can obtain a copy of their medical records.

A copy of the notice must be mailed to the Florida Board of Medicine within a month of the date of relocation or termination of the medical practice. It would be in your best interest to obtain and keep a copy of your notice from the newspaper, just in case the board audits you or someone files a complaint.

Signs at the Office are Optional.

The physician may, but is not required to, place a sign at a location in the office to notify patients by letter of the termination, sale or relocation of the practice. The sign or notice will advise patients of their opportunity to transfer or receive their records. Again, this is optional.

Keeping Medical Records.

Under Section 458.331(1)(m), Florida Statutes, a physician must keep adequate written medical records for a period of five years from the last patient contact, so medical record storage options, which must properly conform with state and federal privacy regulations, will have to be considered. Alternatively, the sale of a practice necessitates an execution of the proper medical record transfer agreement as part of the transaction.

Also keep in mind, a physician planning to close, sell or relocate a medical practice must consider how to effectively notify employees about termination and must properly maintain employee records and other medical billing records after the practice has closed its doors.

Notifying All Appropriate Groups.

On top of informing the Florida Board of Medicine, physicians may also be required to notify other licensing authorities. This may include the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Florida DOH, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), and other local business licensing authorities.

These rules can be confusing and complex. To ensure you have completely complied with Florida law, consult with a health law attorney experienced in these matters.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Business Transactions and Contracts.

At the Health Law Firm we provide legal services for all health care providers and professionals. This includes physicians, nurses, dentists, psychologists, psychiatrists, mental health counselors, Durable Medical Equipment suppliers, medical students and interns, hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, pain management clinics, nursing homes, and any other health care provider. We represent facilities, individuals, groups and institutions in contracts, sales, mergers and acquisitions.

The services we provide include reviewing and negotiating contracts, business transactions, professional license defense, representation in investigations, credential defense, representation in peer review and clinical privileges hearings, Medicare and Medicaid audits, commercial litigation, and administrative hearings.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Have you gone through the process of selling, relocating or retiring? How did you comply with all the rules? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Source:

Rule 64B8-10.002, F.A.C., Medical Records of Physicians Relocating or Terminating Practice; Retention, Disposition, Time Limitations.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Phony Florida Physician Uses Silicone and Krazy Glue – Arrested Twice for Practicing Medicine Without a License

6 Indest-2008-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A South Florida man was arrested on February 6, 2013, for allegedly injecting people with silicone in a West Palm Beach motel room. He has been charged with practicing medicine without a license. According to the Sun Sentinel, this was the man’s second arrest within two months for the same crime.

Click here to read the entire article from the Sun Sentinel.

This “Krazy” Tale.

Police say this fake physician injected his customers with buttocks-enhancing silicone injections. He would then allegedly seal up the skin wounds with Krazy Glue. Victims sayhe would not wear gloves or protective clothing during the procedures. Each victim was charged $200 for each visit. This phony health professional was also arrested in January 2013, when two victims told investigators similar stories about his illegal injections.

In each case, the side effects in patients included severe infections, and the damage is thought to be permanent.

South Florida and Phony Health Professionals.

This is by no means the first report we’ve heard of phony health professionals in South Florida injecting people with toxic chemicals. Back in 2012, a number of people became sick and deformed after a Broward County, Florida, woman allegedly injected victims’ buttocks, hips and breasts with a combination of Fix-A-Flat tire sealant, cement, mineral oil and Super Glue. One of the victims died as a result of the procedure, according to the Daily Mail Reporter. The victims claimed the woman administering the injections presented herself as a medical professional and wore a nurse’s uniform.

To read more on this story from the Daily Mail Reporter, click here.

Practicing Without a License Is a Crime.


Practicing medicine without a license is a crime. Additionally, so is helping someone practice medicine without a license. As a practitioner, you may be asked to supervise or join a practice. Remember that your license may be at stake with any wrongdoing by your subordinates. Before you join a practice or agree to supervise others, check first with the Department of Health (DOH) that the other providers are legitimate. You can verify a license for free on the DOH’s website.

Also, remember that a license to practice medicine in Venezuela, Cuba, or anywhere else, is just that: a license to practice in that country. It does not allow a person to practice medicine in the United States. A specific license from the State of Florida is required to practice in Florida, except for certain military and federal physicians. Always check the physician’s license.

More Stories on Fake Physicians and Other Phony and Fraudulent Professionals to Come.


In the near future on this blog we will include additional articles on fake doctors and health professionals, some old, some new.

To see a blog on a fake dentist in Miami, click here. You can also read the story of a fake plastic surgeon in New York by clicking here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.


The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.


Comments?

What do you think of all of these news stories of phony health care professionals? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Komedna, Ed. “‘Motel Surgeon’ Arrested Again for Silicone Injections, Deputies Say.” Sun Sentinel. (February 6, 2013). From: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/palm-beach/fl-butler-surgery-arrest-20130206,0,2237567.story

United Press International Inc. “Man Arrested Again for Buttocks Injections.” United Press International Inc. (February 6, 2013). From: http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2013/02/07/Arrest-for-illegal-silicone-injections/UPI-97251360271074/?spt=hs&or=tn

Daily Mail Reporter. “Toxic tush transgender nurse charged with manslaughter after patient DIES following ‘injection with rubber cement and tire sealant in backroom cosmetic surgery’.” (July 26, 2012). From: www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2179631/Toxic-tush-nurse-Oneal-Morris-charged-manslaughter-patient-DIES.html#axzz2KKi2pPmh

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Hydrocodone Combination Drugs Could Be Reclassified to Schedule II Category of Controlled Substances

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm, and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee voted 19 to 10 in favor of moving hydrocodone combination drugs from schedule III into the more restrictive schedule II category of controlled substances. According to a number of different sources, on January 25, 2013, the committee presented this recommendation to the FDA. If approved, hydrocodone combination drugs, such as Vicodin, will be harder for physicians to prescribe.

The advisory committee met because the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is requesting the FDA to approve the reclassification of hydrocodone combination products. The DEA wants to help curb the growing number of people across the country addicted to painkillers.

Click here to read an FDA briefing document given to the advisory committee.

It is now up to the FDA to decide whether or not to implement the advisory committee’s decision as to whether hydrocodone combination drugs will stay labeled as schedule III controlled substances or move to schedule II controlled substances. If medications containing hydrocodone are moved to schedule II, they will be in the same category as the widely abused oxycodone.

Hydrocodone Abuse is Serious.

Currently, hydrocodone products are the most widely prescribed drugs in the U.S., according to an article on MedPage Today. Records show that painkiller abuse kills more people in America than heroin and cocaine combined. The DEA argues that since these drugs are so frequently abused, they should be more tightly controlled.

To read the MedPage Today article, click here.

What You Need to Know as a Health Care Provider.

This change would have wide-spread consequences for health care professionals, especially doctors and pharmacists. Under the schedule II category of controlled substances, physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners would no longer be legally allowed to prescribe hydrocodone combination drugs.

If the recommendation is accepted, it would be more difficult for patients to obtain refills on hydrocodone combination drugs. Refills without a new prescription, faxed prescriptions and prescriptions called in by telephone would all be banned. Only written prescriptions from a doctor would be allowed.

If the recommendation is adopted, much stricter scrutiny on the purchasing, prescribing, retailing and use of these medications can also be expected. Prosecutions and administrative actions can also be expected to follow.

The FDA is also debating the DEA’s request to limit prescriptions of hydrocodone combination pills to a 90-day supply instead of the current regulations which permit five refills within six months.

Arguments Heard Against the Reclassification.

According to an article in The New York Times, many opponents spoke against the recommendation. Advocates for nursing home patients argued that weak and elderly residents with chronic pain would have to make a difficult trip to see a doctor just to get a prescription refilled. Click here to read The New York Times article.

Some committee members questioned if there was another option to consider versus changing the scheduling. They questioned whether greater use of e-prescribing and Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, as well as better education efforts for clinicians and patients would be better solutions for the drug abuse epidemic.

Now it remains to be seen how the FDA will interpret the advisory committee’s recommendation.

Florida’s Prescription Drug Abuse Epidemic.

Florida law enforcement including the DEA, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and Department of Health (DOH) all seem to be having a hard time keeping up with prescription drug abuse in Florida.

We have written a number of blogs on the abuse of narcotics in Florida. See our blog on a fake prescription ring busted in Osceola County, and a Central Florida nurse accused of illegally obtaining prescriptions for painkillers, for example. Check our website for similar blogs.

Pharmacists, pharmacies, legal distributors and physicians are often too caught up in the frenzy to stem prescription drug abuse and to eliminate “pill mills.”

Call Experienced Health Law Attorneys for Your Legal Needs.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.
Sound Off.

As a health care professional, do you think hydrocodone products should be labeled as a schedule II controlled substance? What are the positive and negative effects of this decision? Please leave any thoughtful comment below.
Sources:

Fiore, Kristina. “FDA Panel Votes for Tighter Controls on Vicodin.” MedPage Today. (January 25, 2013). From: http://bit.ly/X8qlsu

Tavernise, Sabrina. “F.D.A. Likely to Add Limits on Painkillers.” The New York Times. (January 25, 2013). From: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/26/health/fda-vote-on-restricting-hydrocodone-products-vicodin.html?_r=0
About the Authors: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.
“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Orlando Physician To Pay $10,000 Fine for Prescribing Painkillers to Undercover Agents

4 Indest-2009-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On January 24, 2013, an Orlando physician pleaded no contest to racketeering charges for allegedly prescribing pain pills to undercover agents who did not need them. The physician was fined $10,000 and placed on 20 years of probation.

Physician Was One of the First Arrested in Florida’s Prescription-Abuse Crackdown.

According to the DOH complaint, between 2008 and 2009, the physician allegedly saw two undercover agents six times. Each agent complained about minor pain. Both agents were allegedly prescribed pain medication by the physician.

The complaint states that each office visit between the physician and undercover agents was filmed and the audio was taped using hidden surveillance equipment. This is a common tactic used by undercover agents investigating pain management physicians.

Click here to read the entire complaint filed against the physician.

The physician was arrested in 2010. He was charged with racketeering because the six prescriptions were characterized as an “ongoing criminal enterprise.” For this criminal case he just pay a $10,000 fine and was placed on 20 years of probation.

This physician was one of the first doctors to get arrested in Florida’s prescription-abuse crackdown. In July 2012, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and Florida law enforcement announced a statewide pill mill bust that spanned several cities in Florida. Seven doctors and seven pain clinic owners were arrested. The raid was dubbed “Operation Pill Street Blues” by the DEA. To read a blog on “Operation Pill Street Blues,” click here.

Physician’s Hopes to Settle DOH Complaint.

According to an article in the Orlando Sentinel, the physician hopes to settled the Florida DOH complaint by agreeing to medical probation, which will require him to be monitored by an outside doctor, undergo continuing education and possibly pay a fine.

The physician is expected to continue practicing at his Orlando office.

Click here to read the Orlando Sentinel article.

Legal Tips for Physicians to Manage Pain Patients.

I have represented a number of physicians who have been accused of overprescribing. Some of these were criminal investigations by local law enforcement authorities, such as a county sheriff’s office. Some were investigations by the DEA. Some were investigations by the state licensing agency such as the Florida DOH.

As in this case, it’s common for undercover agents to posing as patients to make appointments with the physician, agents will usually wear a wire device, and give the physician false information.

Click here for some ideas on how physicians might protect themselves from drug-seeking patients. These are tips I give to physicians I advise on this issue.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Health Care Providers in DOH Cases.
The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses, and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the DEA, Department of Health (DOH), and other law enforcement agencies.

If you are aware of an investigation of you or your practice, or if you have been contacted by the DEA or DOH, contact an experienced health law attorney immediately.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Do you think the physician received a harsh punishment? Is it becoming too hard for Florida doctors to prescribe pain medication? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Stutzman, Rene. “Orlando Doctor Fined $10,000, Placed on 20 Years Probation in Pill Case.” Orlando Sentinel. (January 24, 2013). From: http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2013-01-24/news/os-roman-mosai-pill-doctor-plea-20130124_1_pain-pills-orlando-doctor-pill-mill

Department of Health v. Roman Mosai, M.D. Case Number 2009-06572. Administrative Complaint. (June 5, 2012). From: http://www.thehealthlawfirm.com/uploads/DOH%20v%20Mosai.pdf

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.